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Falling out between Houthis, allies threatens all-out war in Sanaa

The Japan Times

SANAA – A Yemeni colonel loyal to former President Ali Abdullah Saleh and two Houthi rebels have been killed in Sanaa, in an unprecedented escalation of violence between the allies with Saleh's party warning it could push the capital into all-out war. An anti-government alliance between Saleh and rebel leader Abdul Malik al-Houthi has crumbled over the past week, with the two accusing each other of treason and back-stabbing. Witnesses in Sanaa, which Saleh and Houthi jointly control, said the ex-president's forces had spread in southern parts of the capital near the presidential offices, which Saleh still holds despite resigning in 2012. They said the forces had deployed in Sabaeen Square and the district of Hadda. Saleh's General People's Congress party said in a statement on Sunday that "remaining silent on the incident would open the door to strife that would be difficult to contain.


Timeline: War, famine and failed talks in Yemen

Al Jazeera

Ali Abdullah Saleh, the ousted Yemeni leader, has been killed by Houthi rebels near the country's capital Sanaa, according to officials from his own political party.


Yemeni forces claim progress in battle for Hodeida's airport

FOX News

SANAA, Yemen – Yemeni fighters backed by the United Arab Emirates said they seized the southern runway of the international airport near Yemen's port city of Hodeida, as fighting raged Wednesday between pro-government forces backed by a Saudi-led coalition and Iranian-backed rebels. The coalition launched an offensive a week ago to retake the port city, which handles 70 percent of impoverished Yemen's food imports. Aid groups have expressed alarm about the operation, but so far coalition forces remain bogged down in battles south of the city, and the port has remained open. The Amaleqa brigades, a fighting force backed by the coalition that includes the UAE, said it seized areas on the west and east sides of the airport. The group has been advancing toward an area near Kilo 16 road, aiming to cut off the link between Hodeida and the rebel-held capital, Sanaa.


UAE-backed Yemeni forces claim key gains in battle for Hodeida's airport amid heavy combat

The Japan Times

SANAA – Yemeni fighters backed by the United Arab Emirates said they seized the southern runway of the international airport near Yemen's port city of Hodeida, as fighting raged Wednesday between pro-government forces backed by a Saudi-led coalition and Iranian-backed rebels. The coalition launched an offensive a week ago to retake the port city, which handles 70 percent of impoverished Yemen's food imports. Aid groups have expressed alarm about the operation, but so far coalition forces remain bogged down in battles south of the city, and the port has remained open. The Amaleqa brigades, a fighting force backed by the coalition that includes the UAE, said it seized areas on the west and east sides of the airport. The group has been advancing toward an area near Kilo 16 road, aiming to cut off the link between Hodeida and the rebel-held capital, Sanaa.


UN: Yemen fighting displaced tens of thousands more people

PBS NewsHour

People walk on the rubble of a house destroyed by a Saudi-led air strike in Sanaa, Yemen on Feb. 2. Photo by Mohamed al-Sayaghi/Reuters SANAA, Yemen -- The United Nations refugee agency said Friday that tens of thousands of people have been displaced amid the latest escalation of fighting along Yemen's western coastline. The stark warning came as the leader of Yemen's Shiite rebels announced that his forces have built drones and missiles that will be used against the Saudi-led coalition and would target the Saudi capital. Yemen has been in the grip of a civil war since 2014, when Shiite Houthi rebels and their allies swept down from the country's north and captured the capital, Sanaa. A Saudi-led coalition has waged a blistering air campaign since March 2015, seeking to dislodge the Houthis and restore the internationally recognized government. The conflict is made even more complex because an al-Qaida branch and its rival, the Islamic State affiliate, have exploited the chaos and grown in number and power.