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Linux Foundation and RISC-V International launch free RISC-V training classes

ZDNet

RISC-V, the emerging open-source instruction set processor architecture, is growing up. Sure, most of the attention has come from hardware hackers playing on RISC-V processors on development boards from companies such as SiFive. But, according to RISC-V CTO Mark Himelstein, RISC-V processors have already found a home in data centers and Alibaba cloud servers. So, it's high time for classes on how to use this new open-source hardware architecture. Then you need to know Linux and open-source software.


Open-source chip mimics Linux's path to take on closed x86 and ARM CPUs

PCWorld

If you're buying a PC or server, you've likely considered chips based on x86 or, perhaps less often, the ARM architecture. But like Linux in software, an open-source chip project is out to break the dominance of proprietary chips offered by Intel, AMD, and ARM. The RISC-V open-source architecture, created by researchers at the University of California, Berkeley, in 2010, is open to all who want to use it. The RISC-V design can be modified for PCs, servers, smartphones, wearables, and other devices. A startup called SiFive is the first to make a business out of the RISC-V architecture.


RISC-V Gains Its Footing

#artificialintelligence

The RISC-V instruction-set architecture, which started as a UC Berkeley project to improve energy efficiency, is gaining steam across the industry.


GPU from Imagination works with RISC-V

#artificialintelligence

The activity around creating a legit graphics processor for RISC-V chip designs, an emerging competitor to x86 and ARM, is gaining steam. Special interest groups at RISC-V next year will expand the focus on extensions for shaders and advanced matrix operations, which is important for artificial intelligence and machine learning, Mark Himelstein, chief technology officer at RISC-V, told The Register. RISC-V International, which developed the instruction set architecture, has interest groups develop extensions that users can add to their chip designs. In 2021, 16 RISC-V extensions were ratified, Himelstein said, and that number will grow next year. Many new extensions were part of mainstream computing chips announced this year at the RISC-V Summit.


European Processor Initiative Tapes Out Their First RISC-V Test Chip

#artificialintelligence

Recently, the EPI announced that it has developed its first HPC chip using RISC-V technology and is now in the stages of having the device fabricated. What is the EPI, what will the new device be capable of, and how does this release demonstrate the potential of RISC-V architecture? The European Processor Initiative collects different institutions across the EU that aim to develop and create high-performance, low-power chips for use in supercomputers and other big data applications. Currently, most processors used in supercomputers are proprietary and often sourced from foreign nations. For example, the main processor technology currently in use is x86/x64, and these processors are only designed and manufactured by two companies; Intel and AMD.