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Dubai airport disrupted after reported drone sightings

Al Jazeera

Flights at Dubai International Airport, one of the busiest in the world, were disrupted on Friday after sightings of a drone flying nearby. The airport told the AP news agency that it halted flights from 10:13am to 10:45am (local time) over "suspected drone activity". It said flights were later resumed. Alleged drone sightings have previously disrupted flights into the airport, which is the base of the long-haul carrier Emirates. One disgruntled passenger tweeted: "Stuck for ages at Dubai airport runway unable to taxi as unauthorized drones have entered the airspace here and all takeoffs have been grounded! "This seems to be happening often in airports everywhere." Stuck for ages at Dubai airport runway unable to taxi as unauthorized drones have entered the airspace here and all takeoffs have been grounded! This seems to be happening often in airports everywhere. Another passenger wrote: "Dubai airport going nowhere due to drone flying around.


US Newark airport disrupted after drone sightings

Al Jazeera

Flights at New Jersey's Newark Liberty International Airport were disrupted Tuesday evening after sightings of a drone flying nearby. "At approximately 5pm (22:00 GMT), we received two reports from incoming flights into Newark that a drone was sighted at about 3,500 feet (1,066 metres) above Teterboro, New Jersey," said a spokesman from the US Federal Aviation Administration (FAA). A pilot told air traffic controllers that the drone came within nine metres of his aircraft. Flights in and out of Newark were briefly halted. The Port Authority of New York and New Jersey operates both Newark airport and Teterboro which caters mainly to smaller private and corporate jets.


FAA details impact of drone sightings on Newark airport

The Japan Times

WASHINGTON - The Federal Aviation Administration said on Wednesday that 43 flights into New Jersey's Newark Liberty International Airport were required to hold after drone sightings at a nearby airport on Tuesday, while nine flights were diverted. The incident comes as major U.S. airports are assessing the threat of drones and have been holding meetings to address the issue. The issue of drones impacting commercial air traffic came to the fore after London's second-busiest airport, Gatwick Airport, was severely disrupted in December when drones were sighted on three consecutive days. An FAA spokesman said that Tuesday's event lasted for 21 minutes. The flights into Newark, the 11th-busiest U.S. airport, were suspended after a drone was seen flying at 3,500 feet over nearby Teterboro Airport, a small regional airport about 17 miles (27.3 km) away that mostly handles corporate jets and private planes.


Still at large: Drones responsible for shutting down one of the UK's busiest airports

Mashable

After a drone-induced shutdown, London's Gatwick Airport is back up and running again. Still at large, however, are the drones which caused around 1,000 flights to be diverted or cancelled over three days late last week, with Sussex Police investigating 67 drone sightings made by the public. SEE ALSO: This drone was built to detect and take down'rogue' drones Authorities also recovered a damaged drone, which comes after two suspects were released without charge on Sunday. Earlier, police had some doubt if there was genuine drone activity. Detective Chief Superintendent Jason Tingley told BBC News that no footage of the drone had been obtained, and that there was "always a possibility" the drone sightings could be mistaken.


Pilots can't spot drones 70 per cent of the time - shock experiment reveals

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Pilots can't spot drones as they approach a runway, warns a shock new study. They fail to catch sight of the flying gadgets 70 per cent of the time - even when they are in their airspace, according to the findings. And they almost never identify the machines if they are hovering motionless above the ground. The disturbing findings uncover a'real and present danger' to safety, warn US aviation experts. Study co author Dr Ryan Wallace, of Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University in the United States, said: 'Dangerous close encounters between aircraft and drones are becoming an increasingly common problem.