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Egypt 'worse off on every indicator' since 2013 coup

Al Jazeera

Four years ago today, Egypt witnessed the overthrow of its first democratically elected president, Mohamed Morsi, in a military coup. The Muslim Brotherhood member had been in office for just a year when army chief, General Abdel Fattah el-Sisi, announced his overthrow on state television, along with the suspension of the constitution and the installment of an interim government. The military said it was responding to the people, who had poured into the streets by the millions on June 30, 2013, over fears that Morsi was becoming increasingly authoritarian. In just over two years, Morsi became the second Egyptian leader to be overthrown. During a wave of popular uprisings that swept across the Arab world in 2011, the Egyptian people also overthrew the 30-year dictatorship of military leader Hosni Mubarak.


Profile: Egypt's deposed president Mohamed Morsi

Al Jazeera

Just a year after Mohamed Morsi's birth in 1951, Egypt's decades-long monarchy rule was overthrown in a military-led coup under Gamal Abdel Nasser. Nasser would go on to pilot Egypt through a fitful transition into socialism, becoming a lasting symbol for the pan-Arab ideology unfurling across the region. Morsi would go on to join the Muslim Brotherhood, the very group that supported Nasser's revolution but then buckled under a crackdown once his government took office. Initially a collaborator during the era of independence, the Muslim Brotherhood saw its members shunted into jail cells as Nasser's secular regime swung from tolerance to state repression in its treatment of the group. But the Muslim Brotherhood, often regarded as one of the most important political organisations in the Arab world, survived the crackdown under Nasser, retaining a political buoyancy that kept it afloat throughout decades of regime change.


'Egyptian society being crushed' five years after military coup

Al Jazeera

Five years ago today, Egypt witnessed the overthrow of its first democratically elected president, Mohamed Morsi, in a military coup. The Muslim Brotherhood member had been in office for just a year when army chief, General Abdel Fattah el-Sisi, announced on July 3 Morsi's overthrow on state television, along with the suspension of the constitution and the installment of an interim government. The military said it was responding to the people, who had poured into the streets by the millions on June 30, 2013, over fears that Morsi was becoming increasingly authoritarian. In just over two years, Morsi became the second Egyptian leader to be toppled. During a wave of popular uprisings that swept across the Arab world in 2011, the Egyptian people also overthrew the 30-year dictatorship of military leader Hosni Mubarak.


Rebooting U.S.-Egypt relations, human rights concerns become a private matter

PBS NewsHour

JOHN YANG: President Trump gave a ringing endorsement to the president of Egypt today. Chief foreign affairs correspondent Margaret Warner begins our coverage. MARGARET WARNER: In a sharp departure from his predecessor, President Trump today did what President Obama never would, welcome Egypt's President Abdel Fattah El-Sisi to the White House. PRESIDENT DONALD TRUMP: You have a great friend and ally in the United States and in me. MARGARET WARNER: Mr. Trump made it clear he's rebooting the U.S.-Egypt relationship to focus on fighting terrorism.


Activists love and lose in the Cairo novel, 'The City Always Wins'

Los Angeles Times

"Cairo is jazz: All contrapuntal influences jostling for attention, occasionally brilliant solos standing high above the steady rhythm of the street." Perhaps, but Cairo is also where Egyptian liberals recently found themselves lodged between the theocratic-minded Muslim Brotherhood and the power-hungry Egyptian military. In a way, it was their beloved Cairo (Umm al-Dunya, or "mother of the world" in Arabic) that disabused them of their peculiarly noble hubris. Consider the sobering title of Omar Robert Hamilton's debut novel: "The City Always Wins." Hamilton's story portrays the street turmoil that followed dictator Hosni Mubarak's ouster in early 2011 and provides a peek into the minds of a group of left-liberal youth.