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Egypt court orders release of former president's sons

FOX News

FILE - This combination of Jan. 6, 2011 file images shows Gamal Mubarak, left, and Alaa Mubarak, right, attending a Christmas Eve Mass at the Coptic cathedral in Cairo, Egypt. An Egyptian court on Thursday, Sept. 20, 2018 ordered the release from detention of former president Hosni Mubarak's two sons who are on trial on insider trading charges. FILE - In this Sept. 14, 2013 file photo, former Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak, seated center left, and his two sons, Gamal Mubarak, left, and Alaa Mubarak attend a hearing in a courtroom in Cairo, Egypt. An Egyptian court on Thursday, Sept. 20, 2018 ordered the release from detention of former president Hosni Mubarak's two sons who are on trial on insider trading charges. CAIRO – An Egyptian court on Thursday ordered the release from detention of former president Hosni Mubarak's two sons, overturning a ruling by another court whose judge surprisingly told police to arrest them and send them to prison.


Egypt's Hosni Mubarak freed after six years in detention

BBC News

Former Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak has been freed from detention, six years after being overthrown. Mr Mubarak left a military hospital in southern Cairo and went to his home in the northern suburb of Heliopolis, his lawyer said. He was ordered freed earlier this month after Egypt's top appeals court cleared him over the deaths of protesters in the 2011 uprising. Mr Mubarak, 88, became president in 1981 after Anwar Sadat's assassination. He had been at Maadi Military Hospital since 2013, when he was transferred there on bail from Torah prison.


George Bush and Hosni Mubarak's make-believe reforms

Al Jazeera

Egyptian war correspondent and journalist Yehia Ghanem continues his series of short stories on the wars he has covered and the people he has met along the way. In the years following the events of September 11, 2001, the image of the US in the Middle East was at its lowest. There were demonstrations against the invasions of Afghanistan and Iraq in Egypt and elsewhere, along with calls to boycott US products. It was during these years, with relations between the US and the Middle East at an all-time low, that Americans finally began to answer the question so many of them had asked in the wake of 9/11: "Why do they hate us?" American officials and researchers had sat in my office at Al Ahram newspaper and asked me that very question.


Do Egyptians still want change?

Al Jazeera

Six years after an uprising that toppled him, Egypt's former president Hosni Mubarak will now walk free. On Monday, a prosecutor ordered his release from a military hospital prison. This was just days after an appeals court acquitted him of ordering the killing of protesters during the 2011 uprising. Mubarak served as Egypt's president for nearly three decades, but many viewed him as an autocratic leader who crushed dissent and embezzled millions of dollars for himself and his family. So, what does this decision to set Mubarak free mean for the millions who revolted against him?


In Mubarak's Legacy, Egyptians See the Failings of the Arab Spring

NYT > Middle East

His retirement started in earnest in 2017 when he was released from detention at a military hospital in Cairo, and returned to his villa in the upscale Cairo neighborhood of Heliopolis. By then, many of the young protesters who had helped oust Mr. Mubarak in 2011 had been imprisoned or forced into exile by Mr. el-Sisi. Last fall, Mr. Mubarak spoke in a video posted on YouTube about the 1973 war, his first interview on camera since his ouster. Last May, he spoke with a Kuwaiti journalist about his foreign policy while president, including his efforts to prevent the Iraqi invasion of Kuwait in 1991. What really caught the attention of Egyptians, though, was a photo of the interview that showed Mr. Mubarak in a suit, sitting in a lavishly decorated room, holding forth as he had for so many years in power.