The airports of the future are here

Mashable

No matter how well-regarded a particular airport happens to be, the slog from curb to cabin is pretty much the same wherever you go. A decades-old paradigm of queues, security screens, snack vendors, and gate-waiting prevails--the only difference is the level of stress. Transiting a modern hub such as Munich or Seoul is more easily endured than threading your way through the perpetual construction zones that pass for airports around New York. The sky portal of the 2040s, however, is likely to be free of such delights. Many of us will be driven to the terminal by autonomous cars; our eyes, faces, and fingers will be scanned; and our bags will have a permanent ID that allows them to be whisked from our homes before we even set out.


SureFly, a New Air Taxi That Runs On Electricity--and Gasoline

IEEE Spectrum Robotics Channel

Range anxiety, the bugaboo of all-electric driving, is even more frightening for all-electric flying, where running out of power has worse consequences than having to pull over to the side of the road. A solution now comes from Workhorse, an Ohio-based firm. It has a passenger-carrying air taxi, called the SureFly, which combines the company's expertise in partially automated operation, from its drone business, and in hybrid-electric propulsion, from its truck business. The craft's eight counter-rotating motors each drive a carbon-fiber rotor, and the power comes from a generator cranked by an internal-combustion engine. You can fly 110 kilometers (70 miles) on a tank, then refill in minutes.


British people are using Wi-Fi hotspots to watch porn in public

The Independent

One in 12 British people use public Wi-Fi to access pornographic content, according to a new report. Some of the most popular places to watch pornography in public are restaurants, train stations, offices and libraries, though the street is also a common choice. Norton by Symantec has warned public Wi-Fi users that they risk exposing themselves to hackers, unless they start taking proper precautions. The I.F.O. is fuelled by eight electric engines, which is able to push the flying object to an estimated top speed of about 120mph. The giant human-like robot bears a striking resemblance to the military robots starring in the movie'Avatar' and is claimed as a world first by its creators from a South Korean robotic company Waseda University's saxophonist robot WAS-5, developed by professor Atsuo Takanishi and Kaptain Rock playing one string light saber guitar perform jam session A man looks at an exhibit entitled'Mimus' a giant industrial robot which has been reprogrammed to interact with humans during a photocall at the new Design Museum in South Kensington, London Electrification Guru Dr. Wolfgang Ziebart talks about the electric Jaguar I-PACE concept SUV before it was unveiled before the Los Angeles Auto Show in Los Angeles, California, U.S The Jaguar I-PACE Concept car is the start of a new era for Jaguar.


The Hyperloop Industry Could Make Boring Old Trains and Planes Faster and Comfier

WIRED

The promise of hyperloop ranks near the top of the spectacular index: a network of tubes that will shoot people and their things from city to city at near supersonic speeds. But even if you never clamber into a levitating pod, the work being done now to make hyperloop a reality could make your future journeys--whether by plane, train, or automobile--faster, comfier, and cooler.


Boats break free in New York's Hudson River amid ice jams, cruise ship slams into train bridge

FOX News

Eight large barges, including a cruise boat, broke loose and floated down the Hudson River towards Albany. Rising waters and ice jams along New York's Hudson River created chaos along the waterway Friday morning when several vessels, including an unoccupied cruise ship, broke free and floated away. New York State Police said in a series of posts on Twitter that the boats broke loose from their moorings in Troy before floating south down the Hudson River towards Albany. State police were forced to close several bridges between Troy and Albany during the morning rush hour as a precaution as the boats drifted south. State police posted an aerial image on Twitter showing the boats floating downriver.