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Qatar-Gulf crisis: All developments until October 21

Al Jazeera

Below are the developments up to October 21. US Secretary of State Rex Tillerson is due in Saudi Arabia on Saturday to discuss the Qatar-Gulf crisis. Tillerson's tour of the region comes amid US frustration over the lack of movement in the crisis. "I do not have a lot of expectations for it being resolved anytime soon," he said in an interview with financial news agency Bloomberg on Thursday. Sheikh Tamim bin Hamad received Kuwaiti Foreign Minister Sheikh Sabah al-Khaled al-Hamad Al Sabah in Doha on Thursday to discuss the ongoing Gulf crisis. The two men discussed the political dispute - along with Kuwait's ongoing efforts to mediate the crisis. US Secretary of State Rex Tillerson has said he has little hope that the months-long Gulf diplomatic crisis will be resolved soon, blaming the Saudi-led group of countries for a lack of progress. Tillerson made the comments on Thursday, a day before he embarks on a trip to the region in a renewed attempt to mediate the dispute.


Gab: Inside the social network where alleged Pittsburgh synagogue shooter posted final message

The Independent - Tech

The social network on which the alleged Pittsburgh shooter spewed vile antisemitic conspiracy theories is finding itself at the centre of unwelcome scrutiny. Robert Bowers, accused of killing 11 Jewish people at the Tree of Life synagogue, was a paying "pro" member of Gab and posted on his profile before the attack. After accusing a Jewish charity of bringing in "invaders that kill our people", the 46-year-old allegedly wrote: "I can't sit by and watch my people get slaughtered. Peer faces calls to be removed over'antisemitic' Pittsburgh post Names of 11 Pittsburgh victims released by authorities Suspect in Pittsburgh shooting faces 29 murder and hate crime charges Peer faces calls to be removed over'antisemitic' Pittsburgh post Inspection of the Gab account in his name showed months of antisemitic and racist posts that had been allowed to remain online. The firm deleted the profile hours after the attack and vowed to help law enforcement, but service companies have started pulling ...


In Netflix's Censorship of Hasan Minhaj, Money Mattered More Than Murder

The New Yorker

What was Netflix really thinking when it caved to Saudi pressure and yanked an episode of the comedian Hasan Minhaj's new show, "Patriot Act," which featured a monologue criticizing a Saudi Arabian royal? Minhaj's monologue was hardly groundbreaking--or all that consequential--given the global fury over the assassination of the Washington Post columnist Jamal Khashoggi by a Saudi hit squad. The Senate passed a unanimous resolution last month holding the Saudi crown prince, Mohammed bin Salman, responsible for the premeditated murder of the journalist. The C.I.A. also concluded with "high confidence" that the prince, who is the de-facto ruler of the desert kingdom, ordered the killing. The Turkish government leaked an intelligence tape that captured Khashoggi's desperate final struggle, inside the Saudi consulate in Istanbul, his execution, and the grisly sounds of a bone saw dismembering his body.


CALLING IT QUITS? US reassessing role on UN council, urges end to Israel 'obsession'

FOX News

President Trump's administration confirmed it is reviewing the United States' participation in the U.N. Human Rights Council, warning Wednesday that it wants the international body to reform its agenda and end its "obsession with Israel." Washington critics have argued that the Geneva-based council unfairly targets Israel over allegations of human rights violations and alleged war crimes against Palestinian civilians in the West Bank and Gaza Strip. "The United States ... remains deeply troubled by the Council's consistent unfair and unbalanced focus on one democratic country, Israel," Erin Barlacy, U.S. deputy assistant secretary of state, told the U.N. Human Rights Council in Switzerland. "No other nation is the focus of an entire agenda item. How is that a sensible priority?"


Turkish police search Saudi hit squad-linked villas in Jamal Khashoggi murder probe

The Japan Times

ANKARA – Police searched a mansion in northwestern Turkey belonging to a Saudi citizen on Monday after investigators determined that the man had been in contact with one of the suspects in the slaying of Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi, Turkish officials said. Crime scene investigators and other officials, aided by sniffer dogs and a drone, scoured the luxury villa near the town of Termal, in Yalova province, and later expanded their search to the grounds of the neighboring villa, the state-run Anadolu agency reported. Police spent around 10 hours searching the two villas for the journalist's remains, Anadolu reported, without saying if any evidence or trace had been found. The Istanbul prosecutor's office said Mansour Othman Abbahussain -- a member of a 15-person squad sent from Riyadh to kill Khashoggi -- had contacted the mansion's owner, Mohammed Ahmed Alfaozan, by telephone a day before Khashoggi's Oct. 2 killing. "It is being assessed that this conversation was geared toward the disposal (or) the hiding of Jamal Khashoggi's body after its dismemberment," the prosecutor's statement read.