Google's controversial DeepMind deal for 1.6 million NHS patients' data called legally 'inappropriate'

The Independent

Google's artificial intelligence division received the medical records of 1.6 million people on an "inappropriate legal basis", according to a leaked letter from a top government adviser. DeepMind controversially struck up a data-sharing deal with the Royal Free Hospital Trust, for the creation of an app called Streams. In February last year, Google said Streams would help hospital staff monitor patients with kidney disease, but a document obtained by New Scientist caused further concern when it revealed that DeepMind was receiving historical medical data, records of the location and status of patients, and even details about visitors. The I.F.O. is fuelled by eight electric engines, which is able to push the flying object to an estimated top speed of about 120mph. The giant human-like robot bears a striking resemblance to the military robots starring in the movie'Avatar' and is claimed as a world first by its creators from a South Korean robotic company Waseda University's saxophonist robot WAS-5, developed by professor Atsuo Takanishi and Kaptain Rock playing one string light saber guitar perform jam session A man looks at an exhibit entitled'Mimus' a giant industrial robot which has been reprogrammed to interact with humans during a photocall at the new Design Museum in South Kensington, London Electrification Guru Dr. Wolfgang Ziebart talks about the electric Jaguar I-PACE concept SUV before it was unveiled before the Los Angeles Auto Show in Los Angeles, California, U.S The Jaguar I-PACE Concept car is the start of a new era for Jaguar.


Artificial intelligence virtual consultant helps deliver better patient care

#artificialintelligence

WASHINGTON, DC (March 8, 2017)--Interventional radiologists at the University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA) are using technology found in self-driving cars to power a machine learning application that helps guide patients' interventional radiology care, according to research presented today at the Society of Interventional Radiology's 2017 Annual Scientific Meeting. The researchers used cutting-edge artificial intelligence to create a "chatbot" interventional radiologist that can automatically communicate with referring clinicians and quickly provide evidence-based answers to frequently asked questions. This allows the referring physician to provide real-time information to the patient about the next phase of treatment, or basic information about an interventional radiology treatment. "We theorized that artificial intelligence could be used in a low-cost, automated way in interventional radiology as a way to improve patient care," said Edward W. Lee, M.D., Ph.D., assistant professor of radiology at UCLA's David Geffen School of Medicine and one of the authors of the study. "Because artificial intelligence has already begun transforming many industries, it has great potential to also transform health care."


Smart speakers will be joined to the health service website to create a virtual doctor

Daily Mail

People could soon be diagnosed by Dr Alexa in their own living room as the NHS announces plans to join up with Amazon to create a virtual doctor. New Government Health and Social Care Secretary, Matt Hancock, will today announce plans to connect Amazon Echo smart speakers to the NHS website. This will give the hi-tech gadgets – which answer questions out loud when spoken to – access to accurate medical information checked by NHS experts. The voice-activated technology speaks to owners as an artificial intelligence character named Alexa, and could soon have a wealth of health knowledge to hand. Government minister Hancock will say in a speech today the partnership will give people peace of mind that the health advice they receive is from a reliable source.


MRI brain scans train machines to see the world more like us

New Scientist

ARTIFICIAL intelligence is taking image recognition tips from a real expert: the human brain. Using fMRI brain activity scans as a training tool has boosted the ability of machine learning algorithms to recognise objects. The technique could improve face recognition systems or help autonomous vehicles better understand their surroundings. Machine learning is still a long way behind humans when it comes to tasks like object recognition, says David Cox at Harvard University. So his group trained algorithms to process images more like we do.


Google X's Astro Teller on why delivery drones will mean the end of ownership Verge 2021

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In celebration of our 5th anniversary, this month we're publishing a series of interviews with innovative leaders about what the next five years hold. To read more about this series, read our editor Nilay Patel's introduction here. Few subsidiaries at Alphabet Inc. inspire as much curiosity as Google X, now called simply "X." X is the company's innovation lab, where ambitious but far-fetched tech ideas are pitched, tested, and either come to life or are ultimately killed. It's where Google's self-driving car concept was developed, where giant internet access balloons were conceived, where glucose-monitoring contact lenses were first experimented with, and where burrito-delivering drones are part of a beta test for bigger things. And while more than 250 employees are behind these far-fetched projects, for the past five years the face of X has been Astro Teller, the so-called "Captain of Moonshots."