Could the #10YearChallenge Really Improve Facial Recognition Tech?

Slate

Over the past week, the #2009vs2019 meme challenge, alternately known as the #10yearchallenge and #HowHardDidAgeHitYou, has become the latest social media trend ripe for think piece fodder. While the challenge inspired a host of discussions about social media narcissism and gendered norms, author and consultant Kate O'Neill put her own spin on the meme in a tweet raising the privacy implications of posting age-separated photos of oneself on Facebook. The post generated enough buzz and discussion on Twitter that O'Neill expanded it into an article in Wired, in which she argued that Facebook or another data-hungry entity could exploit the meme to train facial recognition algorithms to better handle age-related characteristics and age progression predictions. She noted that the clear labeling of the year in which the pictures were taken, along with the volume of pictures explicitly age-separated by a set amount of time, could be quite valuable to a company like Facebook. "In other words, thanks to this meme, there's now a very large data set of carefully curated photos of people from roughly 10 years ago and now," O'Neill wrote.


#10YearChallenge: harmless trend or boon to facial recognition tech?

#artificialintelligence

THE #10YearChallenge was all fun and memes until last week after a tweet moved thousands of people to worry: are we unknowingly helping giant corporations to improve their algorithms for biometric identification and age progression? The #10YearChallenge gained widespread traction on social media this month. It calls for posting two photos of yourself side by side - one from today and one from a decade ago - to show how you've changed. People are participating mostly on Facebook and Instagram, which is owned by Facebook. Some made jokes, paid tribute to old hairstyles or drew attention to issues like global warming.


Facebook's '10 Year Challenge' Is Just a Harmless Meme--Right?

#artificialintelligence

If you use social media, you've probably noticed a trend across Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter of people posting their then-and-now profile pictures, mostly from 10 years ago and this year. Kate O'Neill is the founder of KO Insights and the author of Tech Humanist and Pixels and Place: Connecting Human Experience Across Physical and Digital Spaces. My flippant tweet began to pick up traction. My intent wasn't to claim that the meme is inherently dangerous. But I knew the facial recognition scenario was broadly plausible and indicative of a trend that people should be aware of.


Facebook's '10 Year Challenge' Is Just a Harmless Meme--Right?

WIRED

If you use social media, you've probably noticed a trend across Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter of people posting their then-and-now profile pictures, mostly from 10 years ago and this year. Kate O'Neill is the founder of KO Insights and the author of Tech Humanist and Pixels and Place: Connecting Human Experience Across Physical and Digital Spaces. My flippant tweet began to pick up traction. My intent wasn't to claim that the meme is inherently dangerous. But I knew the facial recognition scenario was broadly plausible and indicative of a trend that people should be aware of.


Facebook hits back at claims it is using '10-year challenge' to train its AI

Daily Mail - Science & tech

The 10-year challenge meme may seem harmless, but a new report claims users' selfies could be ammunition for far more nefarious purposes. Millions of internet users have participated in the meme, where they upload a photo of themselves from 2009 and a snapshot of themselves from this year. Some have since claimed that users' selfies could unknowingly be used as part of a dataset for Facebook's facial recognition algorithm to learn age progression and age recognition, according to Wired. The report argues that photos uploaded with the #10yearchallenge would make it easy for a facial recognition algorithm to study a set of before-and-after photos. In the best case scenario, this data could be used to help find missing children, using an age progression algorithm, Wired noted.