The Internet of Things (IoT) - essential IoT business guide

@machinelearnbot

The Internet of Things is an essential driver for customer-facing innovation, data-driven optimization and automation, digital transformation and entirely new applications, business models and revenue streams across all sectors. The Internet of Things is the logical next step in the evolution of the Internet. The roots of the Internet of Things go back to several existing technologies including machine-to-machine communication (M2M), RFID and sensors. The Internet of Things converges industries and specializations, uniting Information Technology and Operational Technology (IT and OT) and contributing to industrial transformation (Industry 4.0) and a wave of use cases which are either cross-industry or typical to a specific sector. As of June 2017 the main areas of Internet of Things investments (industries and use cases) include manufacturing operations, transportation, smart grid technologies, smart buildings and, increasingly, consumer Internet of Things and smart home automation.


The Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT): the business guide to Industrial IoT

@machinelearnbot

The Industrial Internet of Things originally described the IoT (Internet of Things) as it is used across several industries such as manufacturing, logistics, oil and gas, transportation, energy/utilities, mining and metals, aviation and other industrial sectors and in use cases which are typical to these industries. Just like the Internet of Things in general, the Industrial IoT covers many use cases, industries and applications. Although most Industrial IoT projects are about automation, optimization and tactical or strategic goals in a mainly internal context – and will continue to be in 2018 and beyond, we've seen some really transformational IIoT projects as well. For now, back to what the Industrial IoT is. Industrial IoT in the earlier mentioned sense was mainly used to make a distinction between the use cases, actual usage and specific technologies as leveraged for initially mainly manufacturing and, later, other industries on one hand and enterprise IoT and consumer IoT applications on the other. This distinction obviously is somewhat artificial and on all levels there are overlaps. The fastest growing categories of IoT use cases, for instance, are cross-industry. Moreover, although some technologies, architectural frameworks and applications across all IoT layers differ (edge computing and fog computing are typical in Industrial IoT, there are different types of network and connectivity tools, IIoT gateways serve other purposes, Industrial IoT platforms support other use cases than IoT platforms overall, digital twins are mainly about industrial markets, the use cases for augmented reality are not the same and so forth) between Industrial IoT and Consumer IoT an average large IIoT project will leverage several forms of connectivity and solutions of which some are used in consumer IoT as well. The Industrial Internet of Things also has a second meaning to complicate things. Industrial giant GE coined the term Industrial Internet which really describes industrial transformation in the connected context of machines, cyber-physical systems, advanced analytics, AI, people, cloud, edge computing and so forth.


Forces of change: Industry 4.0

#artificialintelligence

Industry 4.0 signifies the promise of a new Industrial Revolution--one that marries advanced production and operations techniques with smart digital technologies to create a digital enterprise that would not only be interconnected and autonomous but could communicate, analyze, and use data to drive further intelligent action back in the physical world. It represents the ways in which smart, connected technology would become embedded within organizations, people, and assets, and is marked by the emergence of capabilities such as robotics, analytics, artificial intelligence and cognitive technologies, nanotechnology, quantum computing, wearables, the Internet of Things, additive manufacturing, and advanced materials. While its roots are in manufacturing, Industry 4.0 is about more than simply production. Smart, connected technologies can transform how parts and products are designed, made, used, and maintained. They can also transform organizations themselves: how they make sense of information and act upon it to achieve operational excellence and continually improve the consumer/partner experience.


The Industrial Internet of Things: A guide to deployments, vendors and platforms

ZDNet

Technologies such as 5G, IoT sensors and platforms, edge computing, AI and analytics, robotics, blockchain, additive manufacturing and virtual/augmented reality are coalescing into a fertile environment for the Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT), which is set to usher in what's often described as the Fourth Industrial Revolution or Industry 4.0. Here's how analyst firm IoT Analytics sees the relationship between the broader IoT and the IIoT/Industry 4.0 sector: This ebook, based on the latest ZDNet / TechRepublic special feature, explores how infrastructure around the world is being linked together via sensors, machine learning and analytics. In this brave new world, supply chains will have end-to-end transparency thanks to sensors, data networks and analytics capabilities at key points. All other things (trade barriers, for example) being equal, parts and raw materials will arrive just in time at highly automated factories, and the fate of the resulting products will be tracked throughout their lifetimes to eventual recycling. Similarly, 'smart farms' will combine emerging IIoT-related technologies into integrated high-resolution crop production systems based on robotics, big data and analytics.


Internet of Things - the complete online guide to the IoT

#artificialintelligence

The Internet of Things is an essential driver for customer-facing innovation, data-driven optimization and automation, digital transformation and entirely new applications, business models and revenue streams across all sectors. The Internet of Things is the logical next step in the evolution of the Internet. The IoT converges industries and specializations, uniting IT (Information Technology) and OT (Operatonal Technology) and contributing to industrial transformation (Industry 4.0) and a wave of use cases which are either cross-industry or typical to a specific sector. As of June 2017 the main areas of IoT investments (industries and use cases) include manufacturing operations, transportation, smart grid technologies, smart buildings and, increasingly consumer IoT and smart home technologies – check out our major IoT trends. The interconnection of physical devices with embedded sensing and communication possibilities, including sensors and actuators, is not new.