The Tiny Brain Chip That May Supercharge Your Mind

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If you're asking Bryan Johnson, founder of startup Kernel, he'll tell you those machines should be implanted inside our brains. His team is working with top neuroscientists to build a tiny brain chip--also known as a neuroprosthetic--to help people with disease-related brain damage. In the long term, though, Johnson sees the product applicable to anyone who wants a bit of a brain boost. Yes, some might flag this technology as yet another invention leading us toward a future where technology just helps the privileged get further in life. But helping restore brain function in stroke survivors or memory for those with dementia would be life changing for those individuals and their families.


New wireless device helps paralyzed monkeys regain use of their legs

The Japan Times

GENEVA – A new device has allowed two monkeys to regain use of their paralyzed legs by transmitting brain signals wirelessly, bypassing their spinal cord lesions, a study released Wednesday by the journal Nature said. The implantable device, called a neuroprosthetic interface, was developed by an international team led by researchers at the Federal Polytechnic School of Lausanne (EPFL) and may soon be tested as a remedy for paralysis in humans. "For the first time, I can imagine a completely paralyzed patient able to move their legs through this brain-spine interface," Jocelyne Bloch, a neurosurgeon at the Lausanne University Hospital, said in a press release from EPFL. The interface conceived at EPFL is a multicomponent brain-spine connector, which decodes signals from the part of the motor cortex responsible for leg movements. It then relays those signals in real time to the lumbar region of the spinal cord that activates leg muscles to walk.


Brain Prosthetic Allows Paralyzed Man to Move His Hand Again

The Atlantic - Technology

On June 13th, 2010, college freshman Ian Burkhart was goofing off in the ocean with his friends, when he dove into the wrong wave. It pushed him down onto a shallow sandbar, breaking his neck at the fifth cervical vertebra and instantly paralyzing him. He couldn't feel his arms or legs. It would be four years before he moved his hand again. After his condition stabilized, Burkhart moved back home with his family in Columbus, Ohio and started doing rehabilitation therapy at Ohio State University.


Augmenting The Brain Is Set To Pioneer Alzheimer's Treatment Big Cloud Recruitment

#artificialintelligence

As artificial intelligence becomes more human, to co-exist, does human intelligence need to become more artificial? We've spent a lot of time philosophizing about where Artificial Intelligence is going to take us, how far we are to achieving general AI and the implications it will have on humanity – all not without the sky net scenarios! Hype aside, there are companies out there who are focusing on how we can use artificially intelligent applications to improve the human experience, sustain life on our planet and significantly boost the economy. This pioneering technology could well see the next world-changing scientific discovery hailing from Silicon Valley, especially considering the significant increase in investment over the past few years. According to the Alzheimer's Association, there are more than 5 million Americans living with Alzheimer's today, with a predicted 16 million by 2050, and a further 850,000 people with dementia in the UK.


Salamander robot can walk, crawl and swim like the real deal

Engadget

Pleurobot is made up of 3D-printed bones, motorized joints and an electronic circuitry that serves as its synthetic central nervous system. It has fewer vertebrae than an actual salamander, but the scientists optimized their placement so that the machine's movements look as authentic and natural as possible. Team leader Auke Ijspeert says Pleurobot can help them understand vertebrate locomotion. You see, the lowest level of electrical stimulation in salamanders' spinal cords is associated with walking, while the highest is associated with swimming. As such, the machine can help scientists explore the relationship between spinal cord stimulation and a vertebrate animal's movements.