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6 Disadvantages of Facial Recognition You Need to Be Aware of - Tech Business Guide

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Facial recognition technology is generating lots of excitement. Yet, it is also very controversial around issues like privacy, reliability, possible bias and lack of regulation. As a result, businesses must beware of the potential disadvantages of facial recognition. There is much criticism about the use of facial recognition technology. Thus, interest groups tend to be very opinionated about it.


What Is Facial Recognition And How Is It Used?

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Facial recognition technology has dominated discussions in technology circles for some time now. Faced with increased surveillance in public spaces, it has become imperative for stakeholders to have some input on future deployments of these novel technologies. More importantly, the general public should have some degree of understanding of facial recognition and how it's being used today. Facial recognition is a term used to refer to technologies used to analyze and recognize faces from video recordings and still images. Advancements in image processing and AI have enabled today's computer to read even the subtlest details in the human face like eyelashes to differentiate people.


Facial recognition push at India airports raises privacy concerns

The Japan Times

BANGKOK - The launch of facial recognition technology at two Indian airports and plans to place it in police stations have stoked fears over privacy and increased surveillance among human rights groups in the country. The "paperless biometric technology" launched in Bengaluru airport this week identifies passengers by their face, doing away with the need to present boarding passes, passports and other identity documents, according to a statement from the airport in India's tech capital. Another airport in the southern Indian city of Hyderabad is also testing facial recognition technology this month. While airlines, airports and the companies developing the software promise greater security and increased efficiency, some technology analysts and privacy experts say the benefits are not clear, and come at the cost of privacy and greater surveillance. This is particularly true of India, which does not have a data protection law or an electronic surveillance framework, said Vidushi Marda, a lawyer and advisor at human rights group Article 19.


Mass surveillance fears as India readies facial recognition system

The Japan Times

NEW DELHI – As India prepares to install a nationwide facial recognition system in an effort to catch criminals and find missing children, human rights and technology experts on Thursday warned of the risks to privacy from increased surveillance. Use of the camera technology is an effort in "modernizing the police force, information gathering, criminal identification, verification," according to India's national crime bureau. Likely to be among the world's biggest facial recognition systems, the government contract is due to be awarded Friday. But there is little information on where it will be deployed, what the data will be used for and how data storage will be regulated, said Apar Gupta, executive director of non-profit Internet Freedom Foundation. "It is a mass surveillance system that gathers data in public places without there being an underlying cause to do so," he said.


Mass surveillance fears as India readies facial recognition system

The Japan Times

NEW DELHI – As India prepares to install a nationwide facial recognition system in an effort to catch criminals and find missing children, human rights and technology experts warn of the risks to privacy from increased surveillance. Use of the camera technology is an effort in "modernizing the police force, information gathering, criminal identification, verification," according to India's national crime bureau. Likely to be among the world's biggest facial recognition systems, the government contract was due to be awarded Friday. But there is little information on where it will be deployed, what the data will be used for and how data storage will be regulated, said Apar Gupta, executive director of the nonprofit Internet Freedom Foundation. "It is a mass surveillance system that gathers data in public places without there being an underlying cause to do so," he said.