BAE Systems Wants To Defeat Jammers With Thinking Machines

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Radar used to be a slow science. Electronic warfare is a blanket term that encompasses the radar signals used to detect an attack, the radios used to communicate that the attack is coming, and the specific radio interference sent to confuse enemy radars as they're attacking. And in the Cold War, every part of this used to be analog. "In Vietnam we learned what an SA-2 radar signal started looking like," Joshua Niedzwiecki, director of the Sensor Processing and Exploitation group at BAE Systems, tells Popular Science. The SA-2 is a surface to air missile that destroyed a lot of U.S. Air Force planes, especially B-52 bombers, over Vietnam.


A.I. Is Making It Easier to Kill (You). Here's How.

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Times Documentaries 19:10 A.I. Is Making It Easier to Kill (You). Culture 10:49 Where Are All the Bob Ross Paintings? Times Documentaries 12:31 Chinese Cameras Come With Chinese Tactics Health 9:13 How China Creates Cancer Refugees Times Documentaries 9:15 Inside China's Predatory Health Care System Dispatches 2:39 What's Left in Laos After a Massive Dam Collapsed Immigration 9:30 'I Just Simply Did What He Wanted': Sexual Abuse Inside Immigrant Detention Facilities Immigration 6:06 The Texas Law Silencing Undocumented Women Dispatches 4:10 How to Win an Election in Venezuela: Control the Food Dispatches 2:59 In the Ambulance With Gaza's Paramedics Dispatches 5:07 What Life Is Like on Gaza's Side of the Fence Dispatches 3:13 Inside a Philippine City Seized by ISIS Loyalists Times Documentaries 19:10 A.I. Is Making It Easier to Kill (You). A.I. Is Making It Easier to Kill (You). Culture 10:49 Where Are All the Bob Ross Paintings?


AI: Man vs machine, or man AND machine?

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WITH the recent triumph of the Google AlphaGo program over Go master Lee Se-dol in Seoul, the doomsayers are in full chorus again over the spectre of Hollywood-style artificial intelligence (AI) taking over humanity. It was the same fear in the late 1990s when IBM's Deep Blue supercomputer beat then reigning chess world champion Garry Kasparov. There are a few differences however: Go is considered a much more intricate game than chess, and AI technology has improved quite a bit since then, and we're seeing breakthroughs such as Google's self-driving cars, virtual assistants like Apple's Siri and Microsoft's Cortana, and even IBM Watson's win in popular trivia quiz Jeopardy!. Enough that even sober scientists are taking note. In a December 2014 interview with the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC), renowned physicist Stephen Hawking expressed his concerns, saying that AI poses a threat to humanity's existence, despite its usefulness.


Machine Over Man: Enter AlphaGo, Exit The Human?

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NEW DELHI: Artificial intelligence (AI) or machine intelligence has always been a little scary. We picture evil robots controlling the world and making human beings obsolete or, even worse, using us as energy sources as in the Matrix. The defeat by Google's DeepMind โ€“ a computer program โ€“ of the world champion in Go, an ancient Chinese board game, has reinforced the apocalyptic vision of machines taking over the world in the popular media. Not that this vision is totally wrong. The more we transfer human skills to the machine, the more obsolescence in the work force.


Inside the killer robot 'arms race' where the world's five leading superpowers are secretly preparing for an all-out futuristic war

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WORLD superpowers are engaged in a feverish "arms race" to develop the first killer robots completely removed from human control, the Sun Online can reveal. These machines will mark a dramatic escalation in computer AI from the drones and robots currently in use, all of which still require a human to press the "kill button". In a series of exclusive interviews, leading experts told The Sun Online machines making life or death decisions will likely be developed within the next 10 years. Fears are now growing about the implications of creating such smart machines, as are concerns they will fall into the hands of terrorist groups such as ISIS. Locked in this new race for military supremacy is Britain, the US, China, Russia and Israel โ€“ all of which have robot programmes of varying advancement.