Goto

Collaborating Authors

Outsourcer Infosys to add 2,000 U.S. jobs in Indiana

USATODAY - Tech Top Stories

SAN FRANCISCO – Infosys, one of the Indian companies that's drawn unwanted attention for its business model of hiring Indian engineers on H-1B visas and outsourcing their lower cost labor to U.S firms, now wants to hire American. On Tuesday it plans to announce the opening of a 2,000-employee tech center in Indianapolis, Ind., with another 8,000 jobs for American IT workers in coming years. The workers will mainly be computer scientists, engineers and programmers, CEO Vishal Sikka told USA TODAY. The tech center will be located in Indianapolis and will open in August of this year. It will be fully staffed by 2021 and its workers will become part of Infosys' global integrated workforce, Sikka said.


Outsourcer Infosys to add 2,000 U.S. jobs in Indiana

Boston Herald

SAN FRANCISCO – Infosys, one of the Indian companies that's drawn unwanted attention for its business model of hiring Indian engineers on H-1B visas and outsourcing their lower cost labor to U.S firms, now wants to hire American. On Tuesday it plans to announce the opening of a 2,000-employee tech center in Indianapolis, Ind., with another 8,000 jobs for American IT workers in coming years. The workers will mainly be computer scientists, engineers and programmers, CEO Vishal Sikka told USA TODAY. The tech center will be located in Indianapolis and will open in August of this year. It will be fully staffed by 2021 and its workers will become part of Infosys' global integrated workforce, Sikka said.


Trump's Pressure on Tech Outsourcers Might Be Paying Off

WIRED

President Trump has long promised to crack down on tech firms that undercut American workers by bringing in less expensive foreign labor. Last month, he signed an executive order that promised extra oversight of the H-1B visa system that speeds the entry of high-skilled tech workers into the US. Critics called the order a public relations stunt that was unlikely to have any real impact on abuses in the system. Despite the lack of substance in the measure itself, however, the mounting rhetorical pressure from the White House may still be paying off. On Tuesday, Infosys, an IT placement firm and one of the country's top employers of H-1B visa holders, announced plans to hire 10,000 American workers by 2020.


In major shift, Indian outsourcer Infosys will hire 10,000 U.S. workers

USATODAY - Tech Top Stories

SAN FRANCISCO – Infosys, one of the Indian companies that's drawn unwanted attention for its business model of hiring Indian engineers on H-1B visas and outsourcing their lower cost labor to U.S firms, now wants to hire American. On Tuesday it plans to announce the opening of a 2,000-employee tech center in Indianapolis, Ind., with another 8,000 jobs for American IT workers in coming years. The deal comes with a strong dose of sweetener -- Indiana will give Infosys up to $31 million in conditional tax credits and training grants, the largest incentive package in the state's history. The workers will mainly be computer scientists, engineers and programmers, CEO Vishal Sikka told USA TODAY. The tech center will be located in Indianapolis and will open in August of this year.


Infosys opens Raleigh hub, brings total American hires in a year to 4,700

ZDNet

Infosys continued to execute its new business strategy by hiring 500 Americans for its technology hub in Raleigh, N.C., bringing its total in just about a year to 4,700 people. US President Donald Trump's onslaught against the H1-B visa, which Indian IT firms procured en masse to execute projects in the US, has certainly been a powerful factor that has forced Indian firms to look at hiring domestic American workers. Also: India threatens'stiff' penalties as net neutrality approved: However, the reality is that, Trump apart, radical structural change was already in the works. IT's old business of infrastructure maintenance and application development, having become thoroughly commoditised, was firmly on its way out, and the new era of cloud, mobile, social, and AI was quickly becoming the core to winning any contract. Even before Trump's war, there had begun a marked slowdown in H1-B applications by the IT majors.