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More than 110,000 Australians caught up in September's Facebook cyber-attack

The Guardian

The detailed personal information of more than 60,000 Australians was exposed in a massive cyber-attack on Facebook last year, giving hackers the ability to access their movements, hometown, search history, email and phone number. Internal documents reveal the attack on Facebook in September last year affected an estimated 111,813 Australians, among roughly 29 million worldwide. About 47,912 had only basic personal information – their name, email and phone number – compromised. But other Australians were more exposed. Hackers were able to access information on 62,306 users' hometown, most recent check-ins, birthday, education, work history, Facebook search history, name, email, phone number, gender, relationship status and religion.


Snapchat makes custom filters for Australia's veteran's day

Mashable

Snapchat, helping the youths connect with history. Anzac Day, held each year on April 25, marks the date Australian troops landed at Gallipoli, Turkey in 1915 during World War I. It's a day of remembrance for those who served, and what better way to memorialise the tragedy of war than with a bunch of thematic Snapchat filters to share with your mates? SEE ALSO: Snapchat adds'Purple Rain' geofilter to honor Prince The company created three custom options for the day, including a wreath of poppies with the tagline "Lest We Forget," as well as a coin paddle, which is used for the Aussie gambling game, two-up -- only legally played publicly on Anzac Day. Snapchat also created a live story that users could submit to for the occasion. The montage started out with footage from a dawn service in Auckland, New Zealand, where the day is also celebrated, and some quite lovely video of veterans marching.


From the Web to Real Life: The Growing Threat of Online-Bred Right-Wing Extremism

Der Spiegel International

At around 1:30 p.m. on a recent Friday afternoon, some people on 8chan, an online message board, watched a mass murder unfold. Brenton Tarrant had just announced he would carry out a deadly attack and stream it live on Facebook. The first fans quickly voiced their support. "Good luck," one user wrote; another: "Sounds fun." A third person wrote that it was the "best start to a weekend ever." When Tarrant's head-mounted camera showed him murdering the first person at the entrance to the Al Noor Mosque in Christchurch, New Zealand -- someone who had just greeted him kindly -- a fourth person wrote, "Holy fuck nice shootin." Around 200 Facebook users watched through their smartphones, tablets or computers as the 28-year-old got out of his car, opened his trunk where he kept his weapons, and began killing 50 people in and around two mosques. His victims included children, like the 3-year-old Mucad Ibrahim; students, like the 14-year-old Sayyad Milne; men, like the father Khaled Mustafa, and women, like Husne Ara Parvin, who was gunned down while trying to protect her wheelchair-bound husband. A mass killing of Muslims, documented in real time, filmed in the style of a first-person-shooter video game and cheered on like a football match. "This is how we win," a fifth person wrote. It's hard to imagine a greater contempt for humanity. None of the 200 users flagged the video to Facebook, and thousands of people have watched the livestream after the fact. The social network, whose CEO, Mark Zuckerberg, likes to brag about the tens of thousands of moderators on its payroll who constantly monitor content, didn't notice anything at first. Facebook didn't receive the first notice until 12 minutes after the livestream ended.


From the Web to Real Life: The Growing Threat of Online-Bred Right-Wing Extremism

Der Spiegel International

At around 1:30 p.m. on a recent Friday afternoon, some people on 8chan, an online message board, watched a mass murder unfold. Brenton Tarrant had just announced he would carry out a deadly attack and stream it live on Facebook. The first fans quickly voiced their support. "Good luck," one user wrote; another: "Sounds fun." A third person wrote that it was the "best start to a weekend ever." When Tarrant's head-mounted camera showed him murdering the first person at the entrance to the Al Noor Mosque in Christchurch, New Zealand -- someone who had just greeted him kindly -- a fourth person wrote, "Holy fuck nice shootin." Around 200 Facebook users watched through their smartphones, tablets or computers as the 28-year-old got out of his car, opened his trunk where he kept his weapons, and began killing 50 people in and around two mosques. His victims included children, like the 3-year-old Mucad Ibrahim; students, like the 14-year-old Sayyad Milne; men, like the father Khaled Mustafa, and women, like Husne Ara Parvin, who was gunned down while trying to protect her wheelchair-bound husband. A mass killing of Muslims, documented in real time, filmed in the style of a first-person-shooter video game and cheered on like a football match. "This is how we win," a fifth person wrote. It's hard to imagine a greater contempt for humanity. None of the 200 users flagged the video to Facebook, and thousands of people have watched the livestream after the fact. The social network, whose CEO, Mark Zuckerberg, likes to brag about the tens of thousands of moderators on its payroll who constantly monitor content, didn't notice anything at first. Facebook didn't receive the first notice until 12 minutes after the livestream ended.