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The Generation of Textual Entailment with NLML in an Intelligent Dialogue system for Language Learning CSIEC

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

This research report introduces the generation of textual entailment within the project CSIEC (Computer Simulation in Educational Communication), an interactive web-based human-computer dialogue system with natural language for English instruction. The generation of textual entailment (GTE) is critical to the further improvement of CSIEC project. Up to now we have found few literatures related with GTE. Simulating the process that a human being learns English as a foreign language we explore our naive approach to tackle the GTE problem and its algorithm within the framework of CSIEC, i.e. rule annotation in NLML, pattern recognition (matching), and entailment transformation. The time and space complexity of our algorithm is tested with some entailment examples. Further works include the rules annotation based on the English textbooks and a GUI interface for normal users to edit the entailment rules.


Why AI is about to make some of the highest-paid doctors obsolete - TechRepublic

#artificialintelligence

Radiologists bring home $395,000 each year, on average. In the near future, however, those numbers promise to drop to $0. Don't blame Obamacare, however, or even Trumpcare (whatever that turns out to be), but rather blame the rise of machine learning and its applicability to these two areas of medicine that are heavily focused on pattern matching, a job better done by a machine than a human. This is the argument put forward by Dr. Ziad Obermeyer of Harvard Medical School and Brigham and Women's Hospital and Ezekiel Emanuel, PhD, of the University of Pennsylvania, in an article for the New England Journal of Medicine, one of the medical profession's most prestigious journals. Machine learning will produce big winners and losers in healthcare, according to the authors, with radiologists and pathologists among the biggest losers.


Physics teacher at Catholic high school in San Pedro is arrested in child porn case

Los Angeles Times

A physics teacher at a San Pedro Catholic high school was arrested Tuesday on suspicion of possessing child pornography, police said. Daniel O'Connell, 32, was taken into custody during a search of his Rancho Palos Verdes home, according to the Los Angeles Police Department. O'Connell has been a part-time teacher at Mary Star of the Sea High School in San Pedro. Detectives from the LAPD's Internet Crimes Against Children unit began investigating O'Connell after they were tipped off that he was allegedly engaged in inappropriate contact with minors, police said. The National Center for Missing and Exploited Children, a nonprofit organization, told investigators that O'Connell met the minors on a mathematics tutoring website, according to police.


High school biology teacher, 34, accused of having sex with student

FOX News

Miranda Nicole Pauley, a 34-year-old biology teacher at Patrick Henry High School in Ashland, Va., faces four felony counts of indecent liberties by a custodian and one felony count of use of a communication system for crimes against children. A Virginia high school teacher was arrested last Thursday after it was discovered that she allegedly was teaching one student a little too much about the female anatomy. Miranda Nicole Pauley, a 34-year-old biology teacher at Patrick Henry High School in Ashland, Va., faces four felony counts of indecent liberties by a custodian and one felony count of use of a communication system for crimes against children. She was released on $50,000 bond from the Pamunkey Regional Jail on Friday. A preliminary hearing has been set for July 12.


Ex-Nova English teacher admits bilking students in Japan out of $230,000

The Japan Times

HONOLULU – A man who taught English at a well-known chain of foreign language schools in Japan pleaded guilty Tuesday to defrauding his students out of more than $230,000. As part of a plea deal with prosecutors, Rick Mikaele pleaded guilty to mail fraud and impersonating a federal officer or employee. Mikaele, who was a Nova teacher, told two students he could get them a high rate of return by putting their money into a First Hawaiian Bank certificate of deposit, according to an indictment. He then sent them fake bank statements and a bogus letter to make it look like the U.S. Internal Revenue Service was demanding $7,000 in taxes for profit earned on the money, the court document said. Mikaele collected about $128,000 from one student and about $109,000 from another, the indictment said.