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Instagram begins testing age verification tools of video selfies and confirmation from other users

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Instagram has started testing new age-verification tools, including new technology that claims to be able to estimate the user's age using a video selfie. The'Age Estimation' technology from digital identity company Yoti analyses the user's facial features using artificial intelligence (AI), in order to predict their age. Instagram is also a new age-verification method that involves asking three separate users to confirm how old they are. The photo sharing app, owned by tech conglomerate Meta, has begun testing the tools in the US as of today, with the aim of providing more age-appropriate experiences. A third age verification method of uploading a valid form of ID, like a drivers license or ID card, is already available.


AI can tell if users are too young for apps like Instagram and TikTok

#artificialintelligence

An artificial intelligence (AI) tool that can tell if social media users are too young to use apps like Instagram and TikTok has been developed by a UK tech start-up. Yoti's'Age Estimation' system -- which may well soon be rolled out across social media -- can tell how old users between 6–18 are to a 1.5-year margin of error. The software works by comparing the user's facial features as captured via device camera against millions of other images of Yoti digital ID app users of known age. Social media firms such as Facebook have long struggled with how to handle minimum age verification without requests for passport details, which many see as intrusive. An artificial intelligence (AI) tool that can tell if social media users are too young to use apps like Instagram and TikTok has been developed by a UK tech start-up.


Social media: AI tool can tell if a child is too young to use apps like Instagram and TikTok

Daily Mail - Science & tech

An artificial intelligence (AI) tool that can tell if social media users are too young to use apps like Instagram and TikTok has been developed by a UK tech start-up. Yoti's'Age Estimation' system -- which may well soon be rolled out across social media -- can tell how old users between 6–18 are to a 1.5-year margin of error. The software works by comparing the user's facial features as captured via device camera against millions of other images of Yoti digital ID app users of known age. Social media firms such as Facebook have long struggled with how to handle minimum age verification without requests for passport details, which many see as intrusive. An artificial intelligence (AI) tool that can tell if social media users are too young to use apps like Instagram and TikTok has been developed by a UK tech start-up.


Instagram is testing an AI face-scanning tool that can verify your age

Engadget

Instagram is testing new age verification methods including asking followers to vouch for your age and even using AI that can estimate your age via a video selfie. It's part of a push to ensure users are at least the minimum 13 years old and "to make sure that teens and adults are in the right experience for their age group," it announced. For the "social vouching" system, Instagram asks three mutual followers of the user to confirm their age. Those followers must be at least 18 and have three days to respond to the request. Users can still verify their age with pictures of ID cards as well.


Juul Survives a Blow From the FDA--for Now

WIRED

Can you Currently buy a Juul e-cigarette? That depends on what day of the week it is. Earlier this week the FDA denied marketing authorization for Juul, which first started selling its e-cigarettes in 2015 (though it has operated under various company names since 2007). The FDA said the reason for the denial was that Juul "failed to provide sufficient toxicology data to demonstrate the products were safe," ArsTechnica reports, and as such the agency could not complete its toxicology assessment. The FDA specifically pointed to "potentially harmful chemicals leaching from the company's proprietary e-liquid pods" as a concern.