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[Report] A 21st-century shift from fossil-fuel to biogenic methane emissions indicated by 13CH4

Science

Between 1999 and 2006, a plateau interrupted the otherwise continuous increase of atmospheric methane concentration [CH4] since preindustrial times. Causes could be sink variability or a temporary reduction in industrial or climate-sensitive sources. We reconstructed the global history of [CH4] and its stable carbon isotopes from ice cores, archived air, and a global network of monitoring stations. A box-model analysis suggests that diminishing thermogenic emissions, probably from the fossil-fuel industry, and/or variations in the hydroxyl CH4 sink caused the [CH4] plateau. Thermogenic emissions did not resume to cause the renewed [CH4] rise after 2006, which contradicts emission inventories.


Greenhouse emissions hit new record, could bring 'destructive' effects: U.N.

The Japan Times

GENEVA – Greenhouse gas emissions surged to a record level last year and world temperatures could rise more than twice the globally agreed upon warming limit if nothing is done, a U.N. report showed Tuesday. The Emissions Gap Report is one of several studies released ahead of U.N. climate talks in Madrid next week aimed at spurring world leaders to limit climate change. It measures the amount of emissions cuts needed to limit global temperature rises to 1.5 degrees Celsius above pre-industrial levels, as agreed to in the key 2015 Paris climate pact. The U.N. Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change last year warned of huge global consequences if that target is not met, such as the loss of nearly all coral reefs and most Arctic sea ice. "As things stand, temperatures can be expected to rise by 3.2 C this century, bringing wide-ranging and destructive climate impacts," according to the report summary by the U.N. Environment Programme.


Greenhouse emissions hit new record, could bring 'destructive' effects: U.N.

The Japan Times

GENEVA – Greenhouse gas emissions surged to a record level last year and world temperatures could rise more than twice the globally agreed upon warming limit if nothing is done, a U.N. report showed Tuesday. The Emissions Gap Report is one of several studies released ahead of U.N. climate talks in Madrid next week aimed at spurring world leaders to limit climate change. It measures the amount of emissions cuts needed to limit global temperature rises to 1.5 degrees Celsius above pre-industrial levels, as agreed to in the key 2015 Paris climate pact. The U.N. Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change last year warned of huge global consequences if that target is not met, such as the loss of nearly all coral reefs and most Arctic sea ice. "As things stand, temperatures can be expected to rise by 3.2 C this century, bringing wide-ranging and destructive climate impacts," according to the report summary by the U.N. Environment Programme.


France investigating Renault for possible emissions fraud

U.S. News

French prosecutors are carrying out a separate probe into Volkswagen's emissions practices in France, after the German carmaker was found to have used engine software to cheat on U.S. diesel emissions tests.


Global food system emissions could preclude achieving the 1.5{degrees} and 2{degrees}C climate change targets

Science

To have any hope of meeting the central goal of the Paris Agreement, which is to limit global warming to 2°C or less, our carbon emissions must be reduced considerably, including those coming from agriculture. Clark et al. show that even if fossil fuel emissions were eliminated immediately, emissions from the global food system alone would make it impossible to limit warming to 1.5°C and difficult even to realize the 2°C target. Thus, major changes in how food is produced are needed if we want to meet the goals of the Paris Agreement. Science , this issue p. [705][1] The Paris Agreement’s goal of limiting the increase in global temperature to 1.5° or 2°C above preindustrial levels requires rapid reductions in greenhouse gas emissions. Although reducing emissions from fossil fuels is essential for meeting this goal, other sources of emissions may also preclude its attainment. We show that even if fossil fuel emissions were immediately halted, current trends in global food systems would prevent the achievement of the 1.5°C target and, by the end of the century, threaten the achievement of the 2°C target. Meeting the 1.5°C target requires rapid and ambitious changes to food systems as well as to all nonfood sectors. The 2°C target could be achieved with less-ambitious changes to food systems, but only if fossil fuel and other nonfood emissions are eliminated soon. [1]: /lookup/doi/10.1126/science.aba7357