Loss and Loss Functions for Training Deep Learning Neural Networks

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Neural networks are trained using stochastic gradient descent and require that you choose a loss function when designing and configuring your model. There are many loss functions to choose from and it can be challenging to know what to choose, or even what a loss function is and the role it plays when training a neural network. In this post, you will discover the role of loss and loss functions in training deep learning neural networks and how to choose the right loss function for your predictive modeling problems. Loss and Loss Functions for Training Deep Learning Neural Networks Photo by Ryan Albrey, some rights reserved. A deep learning neural network learns to map a set of inputs to a set of outputs from training data.


A Gentle Introduction to Logistic Regression With Maximum Likelihood Estimation

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Logistic regression is a model for binary classification predictive modeling. The parameters of a logistic regression model can be estimated by the probabilistic framework called maximum likelihood estimation. Under this framework, a probability distribution for the target variable (class label) must be assumed and then a likelihood function defined that calculates the probability of observing the outcome given the input data and the model. This function can then be optimized to find the set of parameters that results in the largest sum likelihood over the training dataset. The maximum likelihood approach to fitting a logistic regression model both aids in better understanding the form of the logistic regression model and provides a template that can be used for fitting classification models more generally.


A Gentle Introduction to Cross-Entropy for Machine Learning

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Cross-entropy is commonly used in machine learning as a loss function. Cross-entropy is a measure from the field of information theory, building upon entropy and generally calculating the difference between two probability distributions. It is closely related to but is different from KL divergence that calculates the relative entropy between two probability distributions, whereas cross-entropy can be thought to calculate the total entropy between the distributions. Cross-entropy is also related to and often confused with logistic loss, called log loss. Although the two measures are derived from a different source, when used as loss functions for classification models, both measures calculate the same quantity and can be used interchangeably.


A Gentle Introduction to Cross-Entropy for Machine Learning

#artificialintelligence

Cross-entropy is commonly used in machine learning as a loss function. Cross-entropy is a measure from the field of information theory, building upon entropy and generally calculating the difference between two probability distributions. It is closely related to but is different from KL divergence that calculates the relative entropy between two probability distributions, whereas cross-entropy can be thought to calculate the total entropy between the distributions. Cross-entropy is also related to and often confused with logistic loss, called log loss. Although the two measures are derived from a different source, when used as loss functions for classification models, both measures calculate the same quantity and can be used interchangeably.


A Gentle Introduction to Maximum Likelihood Estimation for Machine Learning

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Density estimation is the problem of estimating the probability distribution for a sample of observations from a problem domain. There are many techniques for solving density estimation, although a common framework used throughout the field of machine learning is maximum likelihood estimation. Maximum likelihood estimation involves defining a likelihood function for calculating the conditional probability of observing the data sample given a probability distribution and distribution parameters. This approach can be used to search a space of possible distributions and parameters. This flexible probabilistic framework also provides the foundation for many machine learning algorithms, including important methods such as linear regression and logistic regression for predicting numeric values and class labels respectively, but also more generally for deep learning artificial neural networks.