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Japanese professor Tasuku Honjo wins Nobel in medicine, together with U.S. scientist, for work on cancer therapy

The Japan Times

STOCKHOLM – Japanese scientist Tasuku Honjo was awarded on Monday this year's Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine, for his discovery of a protein that contributed to the development of an immunotherapeutic drug against cancer. Honjo, a 76-year-old professor at Kyoto University, won the prize with U.S. national James Allison, the Nobel Assembly at the Karolinska Institute said. Honjo opened a pathway for a new cancer treatment by discovering the PD-1 protein, which is responsible for suppressing immune response. "I'm very honored and pleased to receive the Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine," Honjo told a news conference following the announcement. His method of treating cancer -- by controlling the protein's function to suppress immunity -- led to the development of Nivolumab, a drug marketed as Opdivo and used against lung cancer and melanoma.


Nobel Prize winner Tasuku Honjo calls for better-funded and more imaginative pharma industry in Japan

The Japan Times

KYOTO – On the evening of Oct. 1, Dr. Tasuku Honjo was in his office at Kyoto University discussing a manuscript with two of his colleagues when a secretary came dashing in to announce there was a call from Sweden. Shortly afterward, details of that call would make news around the world: Honjo, 76, along with Dr. James Allison, 70, of the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, were jointly awarded the 2018 Nobel for Physiology or Medicine for their pioneering work in immunology -- work that has helped pave the way for a new generation of cancer treatment and drugs. In a recent interview in the same office where he took the Nobel Assembly's call, Honjo admitted his surprise -- it's not every day one is informed of a Nobel Prize win -- but he was also skeptical, for the same reasons. "The person who called me raised the issue (of prank calling), and so he asked me if I would like email confirmation during the call," Honjo said. "I said, 'Of course, yes.'"


Nobel winner Tasuku Honjo sees bigger role for immunotherapy in battling cancer

The Japan Times

STOCKHOLM – Japanese scientist Tasuku Honjo, who jointly won this year's Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine for his research on the immune system that contributed to cancer treatments, said Thursday that he believes most cancers will become treatable with immunotherapy by 2050. The 76-year-old professor and deputy director-general at the Kyoto University Institute for Advanced Study spoke at a news conference at the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm, joined by American scientist James Allison, who shared the prize. The discovery by Honjo and Allison -- on methods to inhibit negative immune regulation -- established a new principle for cancer treatment that stimulates the inherent ability of the human immune system to unleash attacks on tumor cells, according to the Nobel Assembly. Honjo said it may become possible to contain the growth of most cancer cells through such treatment, even if cancer cannot be completely eliminated, as he discussed the effectiveness of combination therapy using drugs in the development of which he and Allison were involved. The Kyoto native and his team discovered PD-1, a protein on immune cells that operates as a brake on the immune system.


Nobel laureates: Despite progress, 'world will never be cancer-free'

The Japan Times

STOCKHOLM – The winners of this year's Nobel Prize for Medicine say they expect substantial advances toward treating cancer in the next several decades, although it is unlikely the disease could be eradicated. James Allison of the United States and Tasuku Honjo of Japan made the assessments at a Thursday news conference ahead of receiving the 9 million-kronor ($999,000) prize. They were named winners of the prize in October for their work in immunotherapy -- activating the body's natural defense system to fight tumors. "Soon we'll get close with some cancers," Allison said, citing progress against some forms including melanoma. But, he said, "the world will never be cancer-free."


Nobel medicine laureate Tasuku Honjo visits longtime barber ahead of ceremony

The Japan Times

KYOTO – Nobel Prize-winning Japanese scientist Tasuku Honjo stopped in over the weekend at a Kyoto barbershop he has been visiting for over half a century as he prepares for his trip to Stockholm next week for the award ceremony. On Sunday, the 76-year-old, who won this year's Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine along with American James Allison for their studies on cancer therapy, was seen at the shop in Kyoto chatting with his 81-year-old longtime barber. "Hey, your hands are shaky. Haven't you ever thought of retiring?" the professor emeritus at Kyoto University asked barber Koichi Ueda, who works with his son at the Biriken barber shop near the university. "He was the kind of student who did not hesitate to speak up about his opinions," Ueda said about his impression of Honjo back when he first came to the shop Their discussions while Honjo was in the barber's chair ranged from the student uprisings of the 1970s to baseball.