Mark Cuban, Steve Nash, Sam Hinkie Involved In $4 Million Seed Round For Basketball Training App

Forbes - Tech

Back in 2001, when Steve Nash played for the Mark Cuban-owned Dallas Mavericks. Now, the two are investing together in HomeCourt. A basketball training app that uses artificial intelligence (AI) technologies to record, track and chart shots in real time has closed a $4 million seed round that includes Dallas Mavericks owner Mark Cuban, eight-time NBA All-Star Steve Nash, current NBA player Jeremy Lin and former Philadelphia 76ers general manager Sam Hinkie as investors. The aforesaid investors trust that the app's development process will go from being strictly about basketball to applying to other sports and fitness verticals. The iPhone and iPad app developed by NEX Team Inc. is called HomeCourt and is already being used by college programs such as the University of Florida, Stanford University and Duke University.


The iPhone App Making the NBA Smarter With Artificial Intelligence

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There is nothing unusual about how little he knows about his own history. Almost everyone in the NBA today came of age in the final years that sports were more art than science. But the game has been transformed since then. A technological revolution has swept through basketball and made it possible for high-schoolers to have more data about themselves than even the most progressive NBA teams had until recently. Lin is now an investor in the latest product that's spreading through the sport and getting attention from the league's brightest minds, a new app called HomeCourt, which comes from a tech company focused on mobile artificial intelligence that was founded not long ago by former Apple engineers who were obsessed with basketball and have spent the last year developing the sort of weapon that Jeremy Lin never had.


The iPhone App Making the NBA Smarter

WSJ.com: WSJD - Technology

There is nothing unusual about how little he knows about his own history. Almost everyone in the NBA today came of age in the final years that sports were more art than science. But the game has been transformed since then. A technological revolution has swept through basketball and made it possible for high-schoolers to have more data about themselves than even the most progressive NBA teams had until recently. Lin is now an investor in the latest product that's spreading through the sport and getting attention from the league's brightest minds, a new app called HomeCourt, which comes from a tech company focused on mobile artificial intelligence that was founded not long ago by former Apple engineers who were obsessed with basketball and have spent the last year developing the sort of weapon that Jeremy Lin never had.


AI coaches are here to unleash your inner LeBron

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A coach is indispensable to the serious athlete -- everyone from Olympians to up-and-coming youth athletes needs experts who can spot the strengths and weaknesses of an athlete's style and cater to their personal needs. But now AI systems are almost sophisticated enough to do the job just as well as -- better in some ways -- than the old human experts. HomeCourt, an iPhone app that basketball players can use to track their shots, might be the first of its kind. If the phone's camera is propped up and aimed at them while they practice, the app will track the position and success rate of each throw. As The Wall Street Journal reported, the free app offers users real-time feedback, complete with an automatically-spliced video recording of every single shot the athlete takes so they can check their form.


An app that uses AI to help you improve your basketball shot just raised $4 million

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Let's be real: you are most certainly never going to be as good as Steve Nash, Chris Paul, James Harden -- or really any professional NBA player. But it probably won't stop you from trying to practice or model your game around your favorite players, and spend hours upon hours figuring out how to get better. And while there are going to be plenty of attempts to smash image recognition and AI into that problem, a company called NEX Team is hoping to soften the blow a bit by helping casual players figure out their game, rather than trying to be as good as a professional NBA player. Using phone cameras and image recognition on the back end, its primary app HomeCourt will measure a variety of variables like shot trajectory, jump height, and body position, and help understand how to improve a player's shooting form. It's not designed to help that player shoot like Ray Allen, but at least start hitting those mid-range jumpers.