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Spy agencies have big hopes for AI

#artificialintelligence

WHEN IT COMES to artificial intelligence (AI), spy agencies have been at it longer than most. In the cold war, America's National Security Agency (NSA) and Britain's Government Communications Headquarters (GCHQ) explored early AI to help transcribe and translate the enormous volumes of Soviet phone-intercepts they began hoovering up in the 1960s. Yet the technology was immature. One former European intelligence officer says his service did not use automatic transcription or translation in Afghanistan in the 2000s, relying on native speakers instead. Now the spooks are hoping to do better. The trends that have made AI attractive for business--more data, better algorithms, and more processing power to make it all hum--are giving spy agencies big ideas, too.


'It's a hacker's paradise out there'

#artificialintelligence

In what could have been the plot of a Hollywood heist movie, the hackers took great interest in the vast aquarium that a Las Vegas casino had installed in its lobby. The casino's owners thought that the huge fish tank was an impressive sight that helped create a classy ambience as people arrived. What they failed to realise was that the aquarium was a easy way to break into the casino's computer system, and the hackers pounced. For while the casino had protected its IT network with the usual firewalls and anti-virus software, staff forgot that the futuristic fish tank was connected to its system so that the water temperature and quality could be automatically monitored. So criminals trying to get their hands on the bank details of the casino's wealthiest gamblers were able to hack into the network via the aquarium.


'It's a hacker's paradise out there'

BBC News

In what could have been the plot of a Hollywood heist movie, the hackers took great interest in the vast aquarium that a Las Vegas casino had installed in its lobby. The casino's owners thought that the huge fish tank was an impressive sight that helped create a classy ambience as people arrived. What they failed to realise was that the aquarium was a easy way to break into the casino's computer system, and the hackers pounced. For while the casino had protected its IT network with the usual firewalls and anti-virus software, staff forgot that the futuristic fish tank was connected to its system so that the water temperature and quality could be automatically monitored. So criminals trying to get their hands on the bank details of the casino's wealthiest gamblers were able to hack into the network via the aquarium.


British spies linked up with CIA reveals WikiLeaks

Daily Mail - Science & tech

British spies helped the CIA find a way to convert'smart' TVs into secret microphones using a codename inspired by Doctor Who killer monsters called'Weeping Angels'. MI5 worked with their US counterparts to develop software that convinced people their sets were switched off when in fact they were on and recording every word they say. British spies has been central to developing the hack of TVs connected to the internet, according to WikiLeaks. The spooks also chose to name it after to Weeping Angels from Doctor Who - monsters who pretended to be stone statues before creeping up on unsuspecting victims. US intelligence has also devised a method of remotely controlling cars and crashing them, leaked data claims.


UK spies need artificial intelligence, report says

#artificialintelligence

UK spies will need to use artificial intelligence (AI) to counter a range of threats, an intelligence report says. Adversaries are likely to use the technology for attacks in cyberspace and on the political system, and AI will be needed to detect and stop them. But AI is unlikely to predict who might be about to be involved in serious crimes, such as terrorism - and will not replace human judgement, it says. The report is based on unprecedented access to British intelligence. The Royal United Services Institute (Rusi) think tank also argues that the use of AI could give rise to new privacy and human-rights considerations, which will require new guidance.