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Report says 20% of children in developing nations suffering from effects of extreme poverty

The Japan Times

UNITED NATIONS – Nearly one-fifth of children in the world's developing countries are living in extreme poverty, according to a new report by the World Bank Group and UNICEF. The report entitled "Ending Extreme Poverty: A Focus on Children," released Monday, found that in 2013, 19.5 percent of children in developing countries lived in households making an average of 1.90 a day or less, compared with just 9.2 percent of adults. Around the world, nearly 385 million children were living in extreme poverty, the report said. "Children are not only more likely to be living in extreme poverty; the effects of poverty are most damaging to children. They are the worst off of the worst off -- and the youngest children are the worst off of all, because the deprivations they suffer affect the development of their bodies and their minds," UNICEF Executive Director Anthony Lake said in a statement.


Living with adult children protects parents against depression

New Scientist

Financial struggles may have forced many young adults back to their parents' homes, but there's a silver lining: parents are less likely to develop depression with their children back under their roof. Until recently, there was a trend towards independent living, but the lack of jobs, low wages and high rents that have followed the 2008 recession are all pushing adults to move back home with their parents. Young adults in the US, for example, are more likely to be living in their parents' home than with a partner in their own place – the first time this has happened in 130 years. Past research into such living arrangements threw up mixed results. While some studies found that adult children can offer their parents vital support, or vice versa, others have found only negative outcomes, with the health and finances of the parents, in particular, being harmed.


Study-finds-separated-parents-split-custody-equally.html?ITO=1490&ns_mchannel=rss&ns_campaign=1490

Daily Mail

Shared legal custody only gives both parents the legal right to decisions about the child's upbringing, school choices, religion, and so on. Shared physical custody means that the child actually lives for equal, or near equal, time with both parents, alternating between separate households. Shared legal custody only gives both parents the legal right to decisions about the child's upbringing, school choices, religion, and so on. Shared physical custody means that the child actually lives for equal, or near equal, time with both parents, alternating between separate households.


Calais Camp Refugee Children Missing: After Demolition, Unaccompanied Minors Disappear From French 'Jungle'

International Business Times

Refugee advocates are calling for an investigation into the apparent disappearance of more than 100 children who were living in a refugee camp in France, according to a new report. At least 129 children who were living in the Calais camp without parents or guardians went missing after the temporary shelter was demolished, and some suspect the children may be the victims of human trafficking or abducted to be part of an illegal network of child sex workers. Helen Baillot, who has been researching unaccompanied minor migrants and the effects of them living alone in the kind of squalid conditions found in Calais, nicknamed "The Jungle," told the National that these children many times do not fully comprehend the gravity of the ongoing refugee crisis in Europe. "Does anyone really feel comfortable that children without parents are sleeping side by side with adult strangers and there is no statutory oversight of their well-being?" The children apparently went missing shortly after the Calais camp was razed last month, prompting a group called Help Refugees to issue a plea to help find them and bring them to safety while simultaneously blasting the lack of provisions made available for them while they were living in the camp.


Eating too much - not exercising too little - may be the biggest driver of weight gain

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Exercising makes little difference to whether a child becomes fat, according to researchers. Instead, simply eating too many calories is thought to be the driving force behind obesity. Scientists compared hunter-gatherer children living in the Amazon rainforest with youngsters from the UK and US. Youngsters from the Shuar tribe – in an isolated region of Ecuador – didn't burn any more calories than their Western counterparts, results showed. Experts found their bodies simply changed what they used the energy for depending on the circumstances.