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Build a chat bot in under 10 minutes using Node.js and the Microsoft Bot Framework

#artificialintelligence

Chat bots are a great way to engage your customers with the ability to provide a truly personalised experience. They are easy to build and provide huge business impact and thanks to the extensive SDKs provided by Microsoft, you don't have to use C#/.NET. As Microsoft continues to transform and embrace open source and support cross platform development, we continue to build SDKs for languages other than .NET creating an open ecosystem that welcomes anyone with any development skillset to adopt our services. As an employee, C# was my go to language for demos and prototypes, however building a simple API or Web App for demo purposes could prove to be time consuming. It's no secret that javascript is gaining momentum as the web development language of choice.


Writing a basic chatbot using Microsoft Botbuilder and LUIS

#artificialintelligence

Getting started using the SDK is quite easy: you can either use Node.js or .NET (this is Microsoft after all), or work exclusively through a REST-based API. Forced to say goodbye to my beloved Python, I went for the Node.js Disregarding the formatting, the code contains four lines in total: the first imports the BotBuilder package, the second allows you to use the console to interact with the bot, the third instantiates the bot itself and the last line contains the dialog info. I'll be using a slightly more advanced version allowing me to use the Bot Framework Emulator to interact with the Chatbot. Let's give it a try.


Developing a Microsoft Health Bot based on Data captured from the Microsoft Band – Microsoft UK Faculty Connection

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The Microsoft Bot Framework provides just what you need to build and connect intelligent bots that interact naturally wherever your users are talking, from text/sms to Skype, Slack, Office 365 mail and other popular services. This is a step-by-step guide which my colleague Peter Daukintis has developed this tutorial which walks you through the development of a Microsoft Bot in C# using the Bot Framework Connector SDK .NET template. You will need to have a Microsoft Band and have collected some sleep data using a Microsoft Band and have had that synchronised up to the Microsoft cloud as this tutorial uses the Bot Framework to provide access to that data. Heart Rate monitoring depends on the current Band mode, It only monitors hr continuously when in exercise mode (along with all other sensors), all of the other scenarios have pre-defined cadences that allow the data to have analytical relevance whilst only using the sensors as much as needed. This is the information that is sent to MS Health, and as such is available through the Cloud API, along with the curated information that is derived by MS Health, e.g sleep efficiency, recovery time, etc.


Writing a basic chatbot using Microsoft Botbuilder and LUIS

#artificialintelligence

Getting started using the SDK is quite easy: you can either use Node.js or .NET (this is Microsoft after all), or work exclusively through a REST-based API. Forced to say goodbye to my beloved Python, I went for the Node.js Disregarding the formatting, the code contains four lines in total: the first imports the BotBuilder package, the second allows you to use the console to interact with the bot, the third instantiates the bot itself and the last line contains the dialog info. I'll be using a slightly more advanced version allowing me to use the Bot Framework Emulator to interact with the Chatbot. Let's give it a try.


Build a Chatbot That Cares -- Part 1 – IBM Watson Developer Cloud

#artificialintelligence

For this tutorial, we're going to power TJBot with APIs from Watson Developer Cloud. We'll start by putting a voice interface onto TJBot, then give it the ability to converse and understand your emotional tones. In part 2 of the tutorial, we'll transfer the code onto a Raspberry Pi and put the whole thing into the physical TJBot itself. For the sake of simplicity, we'll keep the conversation simple.