Reports of the 2015 Workshops Held at the International AAAI Conference on Web and Social Media

AI Magazine

The workshop program included seven workshops, including Auditing Algorithms from the Outside: Methods and Implications; Digital Placemaking: Augmenting Physical Places with Contextual Social Data; Modeling and Mining Temporal Interactions; Religion on Social Media; Standards and Practices in Large-Scale Social Media Research; the ICWSM Science Slam; and Wikipedia, a Social Pedia: Research Challenges and Opportunities. This article contains the written reports of six of the workshops. The Auditing Algorithms from the Outside workshop was organized by Mike Ananny (University of Southern California), Karrie Karahalios (University of Illinois in Urbana-Champaign), Christian Sandvig (University of Michigan), and Christo Wilson (Northeastern University). The organizers did not submit a report to AI Magazine. No technical report was issued. People have embraced social media as a means to express their experiences within and knowledge about particular places, and researchers have continued to analyze these digital traces in order to better understand social activities within particular places. Geotagged social media data such as photos, tweets, check-ins, audio, video, and status updates have proliferated and reveal individual and collective senses of place and local insights into interactions between people and place. However, these digital traces alone cannot reveal a holistic sense of place and placemaking. The workshop aimed to investigate definitions of placemaking -- commonly understood as a collaborative, community, or human-centered approach to the planning, design, social production of public spaces in order to cultivate shared value and recognize specific physical, cultural, and social identities and experiences in a particular place -- and how placemaking intersects with digital and social media.


Reports of the 2015 Workshops Held at the International AAAI Conference on Web and Social Media

AI Magazine

The 2015 workshops at the International AAAI Conference on Web and Social Media were held on May 26 in Oxford, UK. The workshop program included seven workshops, including Auditing Algorithms From the Outside: Methods and Implications, Digital Placemaking: Augmenting Physical Places with Contextual Social Data, Modeling and Mining Temporal Interactions Religion on Social Media, Standards and Practices in Large-Scale Social Media Research, Wikipedia, a Social Pedia: Research Challenges and Opportunities, and The ICWSM Science Slam. This article contains the written reports of 5 of the workshops


Computational and informatics advances for reproducible data analysis in neuroimaging

arXiv.org Machine Learning

The reproducibility of scientific research has become a point of critical concern. We argue that openness and transparency are critical for reproducibility, and we outline an ecosystem for open and transparent science that has emerged within the human neuroimaging community. We discuss the range of open data sharing resources that have been developed for neuroimaging data, and the role of data standards (particularly the Brain Imaging Data Structure) in enabling the automated sharing, processing, and reuse of large neuroimaging datasets. We outline how the open-source Python language has provided the basis for a data science platform that enables reproducible data analysis and visualization. We also discuss how new advances in software engineering, such as containerization, provide the basis for greater reproducibility in data analysis. The emergence of this new ecosystem provides an example for many areas of science that are currently struggling with reproducibility.


Accessible Hands-on Artificial Intelligence and Robotics Education

AI Magazine

The American Association for Artificial Intelligence, in cooperation with Stanford University's Department of Computer Science, presented the 2004 Spring Symposium Series, Monday through Wednesday, March 22-24, at Stanford University. The titles of the eight symposia were (1) Accessible Hands-on Artificial Intelligence and Robotics Education; (2) Architectures for Modeling Emotion: Cross-Disciplinary Foundations; (3) Bridging the Multiagent and Multirobotic Research Gap; (4) Exploring Attitude and Affect in Text: Theories and Applications; (5) Interaction between Humans and Autonomous Systems over Extended Operation; (6) Knowledge Representation and Ontologies for Autonomous Systems; (7) Language Learning: An Interdisciplinary Perspective; and (8) Semantic Web Services. Each symposium had limited attendance. Most symposia chairs elected to create AAAI technical reports of their symposium, which are available as paperbound reports or (for AAAI members) are downloadable on the AAAI members-only Web site. This report includes summaries of the eight symposia, written by the symposia chairs.


The 2004 AAAI Spring Symposium Series

AI Magazine

The Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence, in cooperation with Stanford University's Department of Computer Science, presented the 2004 Spring Symposium Series, Monday through Wednesday, March 22-24, at Stanford University. The titles of the eight symposia were (1) Accessible Hands-on Artificial Intelligence and Robotics Education; (2) Architectures for Modeling Emotion: Cross-Disciplinary Foundations; (3) Bridging the Multiagent and Multirobotic Research Gap; (4) Exploring Attitude and Affect in Text: Theories and Applications; (5) Interaction between Humans and Autonomous Systems over Extended Operation; (6) Knowledge Representation and Ontologies for Autonomous Systems; (7) Language Learning: An Interdisciplinary Perspective; and (8) Semantic Web Services. Each symposium had limited attendance. Most symposia chairs elected to create AAAI technical reports of their symposium, which are available as paperbound reports or (for AAAI members) are downloadable on the AAAI members-only Web site. This report includes summaries of the eight symposia, written by the symposia chairs.