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Judge orders Uber not to use technology taken from Waymo

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Uber's self driving car plans have been thrown into chaos after a federal judge ordered Uber to stop using technology that a key executive downloaded before he left Waymo, the Alphabet Inc. autonomous car arm that was spun off from Google. The order filed Monday in a trade secrets theft lawsuit also forces Uber to return all downloaded materials. Judge William Alsup in San Francisco says in the ruling that Waymo has shown compelling evidence that a former star engineer named Anthony Levandowski downloaded confidential files before leaving Waymo. High-profile: Levandowski, a'swaggering' six-foot-seven tech leader, is one of Silicon Valley's most significant figures in the development of self-driving cars In lidar -- or light detection and ranging -- scanning, one or more lasers sends out short pulses, which bounce back when they hit an obstacle, whether clouds, leaves or rocks. In self-driving cars, the sensors constantly scan the surrounding areas looking for information and acting as the'eyes' of the car.


Uber must disclose key document in Waymo self-driving case

Daily Mail - Science & tech

A magistrate judge has ruled that Uber Technologies Inc must hand over a key document that could shed light on what its executives knew about alleged theft of trade secrets from Alphabet Inc's Waymo self-driving car unit. Alphabet's Waymo claimed in a lawsuit earlier this year that former engineer Anthony Levandowski downloaded more than 14,000 confidential files before leaving to set up a self-driving truck company, which Uber acquired soon after. The document in question is a due diligence report on Levandowski's startup prepared by Uber during its acquisition talks with the firm in 2016. High-profile: Levandowski, a'swaggering' six-foot-seven tech leader, is one of Silicon Valley's most significant figures in the development of self-driving cars Alphabet's Waymo claimed in a lawsuit earlier this year that former engineer Anthony Levandowski downloaded more than 14,000 confidential files before leaving to set up a self-driving truck company, which Uber acquired soon after. Many of these documents relate to lidar -- or light detection and ranging -- scanning, one or more lasers sends out short pulses, which bounce back when they hit an obstacle, whether clouds, leaves or rocks.


Uber fires back at Google spinoff in self-driving car case

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Uber has hit back at claims a key sensor on its self driving car was stolen from arch rival Waymo. It said its self-driving sensor technology was'fundamentally different' from Waymo's, blasting the Alphabet unit's claim that it profited from stolen files in the race to roll out the first driverless car. Uber said in a federal court filing that 14,000 of Waymo's computer files on autonomous technology never ended up on its servers, despite Waymo's claim that its former executive, Anthony Levandowski, stole them before joining Uber. Waymo sued Uber in February, seeking a preliminary injunction to stop it from using trade secrets and other intellectual property at the center of the case. High-profile: Levandowski, a'swaggering' six-foot-seven tech leader, is one of Silicon Valley's most significant figures in the development of self-driving cars In lidar -- or light detection and ranging -- scanning, one or more lasers sends out short pulses, which bounce back when they hit an obstacle, whether clouds, leaves or rocks.


Anthony Levandowski Asks a Judge Not to Send Him to Prison

WIRED

The federal government on Tuesday asked a federal judge to sentence Anthony Levandowski to 27 months in prison for theft of trade secrets. In March, Levandowski pleaded guilty to stealing a single confidential document related to Google's self-driving technology on his way out the door to his new startup. That startup was quickly acquired by Uber, triggering a titanic legal battle between the companies that was settled in 2018. This story originally appeared on Ars Technica, a trusted source for technology news, tech policy analysis, reviews, and more. Ars is owned by WIRED's parent company, Condé Nast.


Battle Over Self-Driving Cars Goes To Court In Case Between Google's Waymo And Uber

NPR Technology

Waymo alleges that, in early 2016, Anthony Levandowski downloaded 14,000 files related to autonomous vehicle design before leaving to found his own self-driving truck startup with several Google engineers.