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Google Chrome Added a Privacy-Focused Search Engine Called 'DuckDuckGo'

TIME - Tech

As it and other technology giants face questions and fines over their practices when it comes to competition and user privacy, Google is adding a new official option to its popular Chrome browser that allows users to search the web using the privacy-focused DuckDuckGo search engine rather than its own platform. The update to Chromium -- which powers Google Chrome -- axes search engines like AOL and Yahoo!, replacing them with DuckDuckGo (in France, privacy-focused search engine Qwant was also added to the list). More search-savvy users may have already known about the company's DuckDuckGo Chrome extension, which makes DuckDuckGo the default option in the Google browser and protects users from ad-tracking software found on almost every site you visit regularly. The Chrome update means you will no longer need an extension to use DuckDuckGo from your URL bar. If you're unfamiliar, DuckDuckGo is a search engine designed to protect any data generated by your search results and history.


How can I remove Google from my life?

The Guardian

How can I stop the intrusion of Google into almost everything? Google's motto used to be "don't be evil", but in the eyes of some it has now taken on the mantle of the "evil empire" from Microsoft, which Bill Gates and crew inherited from the IBM mocked in the Mac's launch advert in 1984. The EU has fined Google €2.4bn (£2.2bn) for abusing its search monopoly by favouring its products. Most recently, Google was fined €4.34bn for "very serious illegal behaviour" in using Android "to cement its dominance as a search engine", according to the EU's competition commissioner, Margrethe Vestager, a charge the company contests. Google started by taking over the search engine market.


Google competitor emerges as worries about bias grow

FOX News

An alternative search engine is seeing growth as Google faces questions about its practices and alleged bias against conservatives. Google dominates search with only few viable alternatives in the field. But in the last few years, Paoli, Pa.-based DuckDuckGo has been gaining as a search engine, one that is built around anonymity, according to Search Engine Watch. "We provide you with everything you expect from Google without collecting your search history, or using it for targeted advertising," Gabriel Weinberg, CEO & Founder, DuckDuckGo, told Fox News in an email. "DuckDuckGo is a good search engine if you value privacy," Paul Bischoff, a privacy advocate at Comparitech, a company that reviews and compares consumer tech products, told Fox News.


privacy?

USATODAY - Tech Top Stories

DuckDuckGo, a search engine focused on privacy, increased its average number of daily searches by 62% in 2020 as users seek alternatives to impede data tracking. The search engine, founded in 2008, operated nearly 23.7 billion search queries on their platform in 2020, according to their traffic page. On Jan. 11, DuckDuckGo reached its highest number of search queries in one day, with a total of 102,251,307. DuckDuckGo does not track user searches or share personal data with third-party companies. "People are coming to us because they want more privacy, and it's generally spreading through word of mouth," Kamyl Bazbaz, DuckDuckGo vice president of communications, told USA TODAY.


DuckDuckGo search engine increased its traffic by 62% in 2020 as users seek privacy

USATODAY - Tech Top Stories

DuckDuckGo, a search engine focused on privacy, increased its average number of daily searches by 62% in 2020 as users seek alternatives to impede data tracking. The search engine, founded in 2008, operated nearly 23.7 billion search queries on their platform in 2020, according to their traffic page. On Jan. 11, DuckDuckGo reached its highest number of search queries in one day, with a total of 102,251,307. DuckDuckGo does not track user searches or share personal data with third-party companies. "People are coming to us because they want more privacy, and it's generally spreading through word-of-mouth," Kamyl Bazbaz, DuckDuckGo vice president of communications, told USA TODAY.