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Ai Can Detect Alzheimer's 9 Years Before Symptoms.

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In a study, published earlier this month, researchers developed a machine-learning algorithm to detect Alzheimer's in brain scans 86 percent of the time. Even more impressively, it identified changes in the brain that showed mild cognitive impairment (MCI) 84 percent of the time. It might be able to identify these changes even earlier, but the researcher's only tested it on individual's who developed Alzheimer symptoms within nine years.


Probabilistic Event Cascades for Alzheimer's disease

Neural Information Processing Systems

Accurate and detailed models of the progression of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's (AD) are crucially important for reliable early diagnosis and the determination and deployment of effective treatments. In this paper, we introduce the ALPACA (Alzheimer's disease Probabilistic Cascades) model, a generative model linking latent Alzheimer's progression dynamics to observable biomarker data. In contrast with previous works which model disease progression as a fixed ordering of events, we explicitly model the variability over such orderings among patients which is more realistic, particularly for highly detailed disease progression models. We describe efficient learning algorithms for ALPACA and discuss promising experimental results on a real cohort of Alzheimer's patients from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative. Papers published at the Neural Information Processing Systems Conference.


New Way of Defining Alzheimer's Aims to Find Disease Sooner

U.S. News

Another problem: as many as 30 percent of people enrolled in Alzheimer's studies based on symptoms didn't actually have the disease -- they had other forms of dementia or even other medical conditions. That doesn't give an accurate picture of whether a potential treatment might help, and the new definition aims to improve patient selection by using brain scans and other tests.


Kris Alzheimer’s misdiagnosis

FOX News

Kris Kristofferson has been battling memory loss for several years, but his condition has taken a marked turn for the better due to a surprising diagnosis. Doctors have been telling Kristofferson that his worsening memory loss was caused either by Alzheimer's or by dementia that was brought on by blows to the head he suffered in his athletic youth, when he took regular part in rough sports including football, boxing and rugby. The iconic singer-songwriter and actor tells Rolling Stone Country that it got so bad, he sometimes couldn't remember what he was doing from one moment to the next. In typical Kristofferson fashion, he began to write a song about it. "I see an empty chair / Someone was sitting there," the lyrics begin.


6 Effective Ways To Prevent Alzheimer's

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Alzheimer's disease is on the rise and every 3 seconds, someone in the world seems to have been developing it. Since there is no cure yet to stop or slow down its progression, it can be wise to prevent it in the first place. Nowadays there are several genetic testing companies that can identify your risk for diseases like Alzheimer's. Here are a few ways that can help prevent Alzheimer's: Also, several autopsies have found that a majority of people with Alzheimer's disease also had cardiovascular diseases. It is assumed that plaques and tangles present in the brain can remain in the brain and not show any symptoms unless there is evidence of vascular diseases.