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ProBeat: Enough with the government facial recognition

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A U.S. government study released this week found that 189 facial recognition algorithms from 99 developers "falsely identified African-American and Asian faces 10 to 100 times more often than Caucasian faces." This should be the last such study. We are long overdue for federal governments to regulate or outright ban facial recognition. This year, the NYPD ran a picture of actor Woody Harrelson through a facial recognition system because officers thought the suspect seen in drug store camera footage resembled the actor. This year China used facial recognition to track its Uighur Muslim population.


Biometric recognition at airport border raises privacy concerns, says expert

The Guardian

A plan to rely on biometric recognition to further automate airport border processing raises privacy and ethical concerns about data security, according to an expert. But another information security analyst says the plan – which would involve 90% of passengers being processed through Australian airport immigration without human involvement – would not present any more privacy concerns than current border control regimes. The Department of Immigration and Border Protection is tendering for a company to provide it with an "automated processing solution" to support its "seamless traveller" plan, which would allow for the automated processing of passengers using biometric identification. Tender documents say 90% of passengers would go through through automated processing points, which would rely on biometric capturing "including but not limited to facial, iris and fingerprints". The department said it was expecting incoming air passengers to Australia to increase dramatically in coming years, and wanted to ensure they could move seamlessly through airports without compromising border security.


Congress pressures more agencies to end use of facial recognition after ID.me debacle

ZDNet

Members of Congress are continuing their push against facial recognition used by the federal government in the wake of the IRS decision to stop using ID.me facial recognition software. On Wednesday, Secretary Alejandro Mayorkas, Rep. Pramila Jayapal, and Rep Ayanna Pressley joined Senators Ed Markey and Jeff Merkley in calling for DHS to end its use of Clearview AI's facial recognition technology. "Facial recognition tools pose a serious threat to the public's civil liberties and privacy rights, and Clearview AI's product is particularly dangerous. We urge you to immediately stop the Department's use of facial recognition technology, including Clearview AI's tools. Clearview AI's technology could eliminate public anonymity in the United States," the members of Congress wrote in a letter to Homeland Security. "It reportedly allows users to capture and upload photos of strangers, analyze the photographed individuals' biometric information, and provide users with existing images and personal information of the photographed individuals found online.


How Much Does a Facial Recognition System Cost

#artificialintelligence

With the help of a facial recognition system, federal agents could capture a man suspected of abuse. The tool detected him in the background of someone else's photo at the gym, in the mirror. So, the agents were able to get to that gym, ask about the man, and eventually capture him. This real-life story, and many others, encourage businesses to benefit from AI services and deploy facial recognition systems. The global facial recognition market size was evaluated at $3.8 billion in 2020 and is expected to reach $8.5 billion in 2025, growing at a CAGR of 17.2%.


Voice recognition software helps decode data from Yellowstone geyser basin

AITopics Original Links

Dawson, a geophysicist with the U.S. Geological Survey in California, said he happened by chance upon the discovery that voice recognition could be applied to seismic data. A visiting researcher from Spain who specialized in voice recognition needed a desk and the USGS just happened to have a spare that she could use. Dawson and Carmen Benítez got to talking one day and decided to apply her skills to decoding data collected from the Norris Geyser Basin.