Artificial intelligence virtual consultant helps deliver better patient care

#artificialintelligence

WASHINGTON, DC (March 8, 2017)--Interventional radiologists at the University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA) are using technology found in self-driving cars to power a machine learning application that helps guide patients' interventional radiology care, according to research presented today at the Society of Interventional Radiology's 2017 Annual Scientific Meeting. The researchers used cutting-edge artificial intelligence to create a "chatbot" interventional radiologist that can automatically communicate with referring clinicians and quickly provide evidence-based answers to frequently asked questions. This allows the referring physician to provide real-time information to the patient about the next phase of treatment, or basic information about an interventional radiology treatment. "We theorized that artificial intelligence could be used in a low-cost, automated way in interventional radiology as a way to improve patient care," said Edward W. Lee, M.D., Ph.D., assistant professor of radiology at UCLA's David Geffen School of Medicine and one of the authors of the study. "Because artificial intelligence has already begun transforming many industries, it has great potential to also transform health care."


IBM Watson finding its way into real-world image interpretation - MedCity News

#artificialintelligence

A large radiology practice in the Miami area is the test bed for the first real-world application of IBM Watson interpreting medical images. Radiology Associates of South Florida, which has more than 75 physicians and handles about 1 million studies per year, is teaming with Baptist Hospital of Miami to apply Watson-powered "cognitive peer review" to medical imaging in an effort to diagnose aortic stenosis earlier. "We want to identify patients at high risk who may have been missed," said Dr. Ricardo Cury, director of cardiac imaging at Baptist Hospital of Miami and chairman and CEO of Radiology Associates. Watson speeds up the peer review process by assisting cardiologists and sonographers in spotting stenosis cases that otherwise might fall through the cracks, Cury explained at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America in Chicago late last month. Watson looks for variations in practice, based on quality metrics and image analytics, explained Jon DeVries, global offering manager for IBM Watson Health Imaging.


Defining Explanation in Probabilistic Systems

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

As probabilistic systems gain popularity and are coming into wider use, the need for a mechanism that explains the system's findings and recommendations becomes more critical. The system will also need a mechanism for ordering competing explanations. We examine two representative approaches to explanation in the literature - one due to G\"ardenfors and one due to Pearl - and show that both suffer from significant problems. We propose an approach to defining a notion of "better explanation" that combines some of the features of both together with more recent work by Pearl and others on causality.


Texas hospital struggles to make IBM's Watson cure cancer

PCWorld

If IBM is looking for a new application for its Watson machine learning tools, it might consider putting health care providers' procurement and systems integration woes ahead of curing cancer. The fall-out from that project has now prompted the resignation of the cancer center's president, Ronald DePinho, the Wall Street Journal reported Thursday. The university recently published an internal audit report into the procurement processes that led it to hand almost $40 million to IBM and over $21 million to PwC for work on the project, almost all of it without board approval. It noted that the scope of its review was limited to contracting and procurement practices and compliance issues, and did not cover project management and system development activities. The audit "should not be interpreted as an opinion on the scientific basis or functional capabilities of the system in its current state," because a separate review of those aspects of the project is being conducted by an external consultant, it said.


Integrating Environmental Data, Citizen Science and Personalized Predictive Modeling to Support Public Health in Cities: The PULSE WebGIS

AAAI Conferences

The percentage of the world’s population living in urban areas is projected to increase significantly in the next decades. This makes the urban environment the perfect bench for research aiming to manage and respond to dramatic demographic and epidemiological transitions. In this context the PULSE project has partnered with five global cities to transform public health from a reactive to a predictive system focused on both risk and resilience. PULSE aims at producing an integrated data ecosystem based on continuous large-scale collection of information available within the smart city environment. The integration of environmental data, citizen science and location-specific predictive modeling of disease onset allows for richer analytics that promote informed, data-driven health policy decisions. In this paper we describe the PULSE ecosystem, with a special focus on its WebGIS component and its prototype version based on New York city data.