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Google Secretly Planning to Launch a Censored Search Engine in China

#artificialintelligence

After an eight-year-long absence from the most populated country in the world, Google search is going to dramatically make a comeback in China. Google is reportedly planning to launch a censored version of its search engine in China that is going to blacklist certain websites and search terms to comply with Chinese government's attempts to censor the Internet, a whistleblower revealed. According to leaked documents obtained by The Intercept, CEO Sundar Pichai met with a Chinese government official in December 2017 to re-enter the world's largest market for internet users. Project Dragonfly -- Censored Google Search Engine Since spring last year Google engineers have been secretly working on a project, dubbed "Dragonfly," which currently includes two Android mobile apps named--Maotai and Longfei--one of which will get launched by the end of this year after Chinese officials approve it. The censored version of Google search engine in the form of a mobile app reportedly aims to "blacklist sensitive queries" and filter out all websites (news, human rights, democracy, religion) blocked by the Chinese government, including Wikipedia, BBC News, Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter.


Allen Institute for AI Eyes the Future of Scientific Search

#artificialintelligence

Google changed the world with its PageRank algorithm, creating a new kind of internet search engine that could instantly sift through the world's online information and, in many cases, show us just what we wanted to see. But that was a long time ago. As the volume of online documents continues to increase, we need still newer ways of finding what we want. That's why Google is now running its search engine with help from machine learning, augmenting its predetermined search rules with deep neural networks that can learn to identify the best search results by analyzing vast amounts of existing search data. Microsoft is pushing its Bing search engine in the same direction, and so are others beyond the biggest names in tech.


What do you need to know about Chinese search engine Sogou?

#artificialintelligence

A few days ago, the news emerged that Chinese search engine Sogou (搜狗) is aiming to raise up to $585 million in a U.S. Initial Public Offering. Sogou, which is owned by internet company Sohu, Inc., announced the terms for its proposed IPO on Friday. The news has caused a stir among those keeping an eye on the Chinese tech space, as Sogou is backed by Chinese tech giant Tencent, the company behind the hugely popular messaging apps WeChat and QQ. But for those of us who might not be up on the state of search in China, what do you need to know about Sogou, and how does its IPO play into the wider search landscape? And could there be any potential knock-on effects for the rest of the industry?


Google introduces new job search feature for UK workers

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Job seekers will now be able to ask Google to find'jobs near me' as the company makes its first foray into the UK's recruitment sector. The new feature makes it easier to find new positions, as it collates openings from existing recruitment agencies directly into its search result listings, Google said. Positions will be ranked by relevance and quality, with Google employing spam detection software to filter-out any job postings it deems to be fraudulent. Users can quickly compare salary information, reviews and employer ratings without leaving the search results page. This detailed new widget will now appear whenever users search for the phrase'jobs near me' on Google UK.


The Google graveyard: Remembering three dead search engines

Engadget

Buffy the Vampire Slayer was the first show on American television to use the word "Google" as a transitive verb. It was 2002, in the fourth episode of the show's seventh and final season. Buffy, Willow, Xander and the gang are trying to help Cassie, a high school student who cryptically says she's going to die next week. In Buffy's dining room, they search through hard copies of Cassie's medical records and find nothing noteworthy. Willow, tapping away on a thick white iBook, turns to Buffy and asks, "Have you Googled her yet?"