Goto

Collaborating Authors

Drones that drive

Robohub

Being able to both walk and take flight is typical in nature – many birds, insects and other animals can do both. If we could program robots with similar versatility, it would open up many possibilities: picture machines that could fly into construction areas or disaster zones that aren't near roads, and then be able to squeeze through tight spaces to transport objects or rescue people. The problem is that usually robots that are good at one mode of transportation are, by necessity, bad at another. Drones are fast and agile, but generally have too limited of a battery life to travel for long distances. Ground vehicles, meanwhile, are more energy efficient, but also slower and less mobile.


‘Insects’ battle terrorism

FOX News

Battalions of insect cyborgs - stealthier than any man-made mini-drone - could soon hit the skies to join the fight against terrorism. Draper, along with Howard Hughes Medical Institute at Janelia Research Campus, have created cyborg dragonflies in an effort to aid intelligence and reconnaissance. Known as DragonflEye, the project would allow the US military and intelligence services to deploy these cyborgs as micro-drones capable of spying for their masters. In addition to the secretive nature of the drones, they're also expected to be more agile, lighter and smaller. The US military, like others around the world, has long pursued tiny flying robots to deploy for surveillance.


Visual Navigation in a Robot Using Zig-Zag Behavior

Neural Information Processing Systems

We implement a model of obstacle avoidance in flying insects on a small, monocular robot. The result is a system that is capable of rapid navigation through a dense obstacle field. The key to the system is the use of zigzag behavior to articulate the body during movement. It is shown that this behavior compensates for a parallax blind spot surrounding the focus of expansion normally foundin systems without parallax behavior.


Scientists have created drones that can fly and drive

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Being able to both walk and take flight is typical in nature, and now researchers are creating drones with similar capabilities. Scientists have developed a prototype drone that can both fly and drive - a breakthrough that could pave the way for flying cars in the future. The development could lead to machines that can fly into disaster zones and squeeze through tight spaces to transport objects or rescue people. The team developed various'path-planning' algorithms aimed at ensuring that the drones don't collide. To make them capable of driving, the team put two small motors with wheels on the bottom of each drone.


Visual Navigation in a Robot Using Zig-Zag Behavior

Neural Information Processing Systems

We implement a model of obstacle avoidance in flying insects on a small, monocular robot. The result is a system that is capable of rapid navigation through a dense obstacle field. The key to the system is the use of zigzag behavior to articulate the body during movement. It is shown that this behavior compensates for a parallax blind spot surrounding the focus of expansion normally found in systems without parallax behavior.