Nvidia CEO: AI is the single most powerful force of our time

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Nvidia CEO Jensen Huang said AI would drive long-term demand because it is the "single most powerful force of our time." Nvidia reported earnings and revenues that beat analysts' expectations as demand for graphics and artificial intelligence chips picked up in the second fiscal quarter. Huang also said his company's near-term growth will come from gaming and a couple of variants of the company's artificial intelligence chip business: inferencing and AI at the edge. During a conference call with analysts, Huang said artificial intelligence is the "single most powerful force of our time" and that there are more than 4,000 AI startups working with the company -- as compared to 2,000 AI startups in April 2017. In an interview with VentureBeat, Huang said the actual number of AI startups Nvidia is tracking is closer to 4,500.


Nvidia Forecast Shows Gamers Keep Spending on Expensive Gear

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Nvidia Corp., the biggest maker of graphics chips used in high-end gaming computers, predicted sales that may top analysts' estimates, signaling that game players continue enthusiastically to seek the latest technology. Revenue in the second fiscal quarter will be 1.35 billion, plus or minus 2 percent, the company said Thursday in a statement. That compares with analysts' average estimate of 1.28 billion, according to data compiled by Bloomberg. While personal computers have been overtaken by smartphones on the list of items that consumers rush to upgrade, the corner of the market that only cares about the latest games and performance is still growing. Spending on components that can cost as much as a standard laptop is helping buoy Nvidia's earnings and fund Chief Executive Officer Jen-Hsun Huang's push to get graphics into new areas such as data centers and cars.


CES 2019: Moore's Law is dead, says Nvidia's CEO

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Nvidia CEO Jensen Huang shows off the new RTX 2060 graphics card at an event at CES 2019. At least that's what Nvidia CEO Jensen Huang believes. The executive, who co-founded graphics-chip maker Nvidia, on Wednesday declared that "Moore's Law isn't possible anymore." A key part of semiconductor manufacturing is shrinking the components called transistors, the extraordinarily tiny electronic switches that process data for everything from the clocks in microwave ovens to the artificial intelligence algorithms running in our phones. Intel co-founder Gordon Moore in 1965 predicted a steady, two-year cadence of chip improvements that would double a processor's performance every couple of years.


NVIDIA $NVDA Event at CES 2019 with NVIDIA CEO Jensen Huang (video)

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Nvidia Corporation is a U.S.-based technology company that designs and manufactures graphics processing units for the gaming and professional markets, as well as system on a chip units for the mobile computing and automotive market. Besides gaming, professional visualization, data centers and auto, Nvidia is now also focused on artificial intelligence. CEO: Jensen Huang (Apr 1993–) Headquarters: Santa Clara, CA Revenue: 9.714 billion USD (2017) Founders: Jensen Huang, Curtis Priem, Chris Malachowsky Tweets by NVIDIAGeForce feedback & comments via twitter @DomainMondo Follow @DomainMondo DISCLAIMER


Nvidia CEO: Gaming will be huge, but so will AI and data center businesses

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Nvidia reported a stellar quarter for the three months ended October 31. Nvidia had $2.6 billion in revenue in the quarter, and $1.5 billion of it came from graphics chips for gaming PCs. But the company's investment in artificial intelligence chips is paying off, with data center growing beyond $500 million in revenue for the first time. Jensen Huang, CEO of Santa Clara, California-based Nvidia, said his company started investing in AI seven years ago, and that its latest AI chips are the result of years of work by several thousand engineers. That has given the company an edge in AI, and other rivals are scrambling to keep up, he said.