Trump pulls out of Paris for the 'voters of Pittsburgh' – who voted for Clinton

Mashable

On Wednesday, President Trump announced that he would be withdrawing the United States from the Paris Climate Agreement -- all on behalf of the voters of Pittsburgh. "I was elected by the voters of Pittsburgh, not Paris," Trump said. It's a decent piece of alliteration for a marginally literate president, I guess, but there's one tiny little caveat the president forgot: The people of Pittsburgh didn't vote for him. SEE ALSO: One map tells you all you need to know about Trump's withdrawal from the Paris Agreement Allegheny County, Pennsylvania, which includes Pittsburgh, voted for Hillary by impressive margins: 55.9% of the county went to Clinton, compared to just 39.5% for Trump. Over 107,000 more Pittsburgh voters wanted Hillary and, by extension, the Paris Climate Agreement.


Pittsburgh, nearly 100 other cities, defy Trump and stand with Paris Accord

FOX News

Pittsburgh's Democratic Mayor Bill Peduto signed an executive order on Friday promising the city will continue to comply with the Paris Climate Agreement, joining at least 91 other cities defying President Trump's decision to withdraw the U.S. from the global climate commitment. Under the executive order, Pittsburgh will continue working toward clean energy climate objectives, including 100 percent renewable energy consumption for municipal operations by 2030. The Pittsburgh mayor on Thursday blasted the President's decision to abandon the Paris accord, stating "it will set us back decades." The steel city became the focal point of the opposition to Trump's climate decision after the president said he backed out of the Paris deal because it was unfair to the U.S. "I was elected to represent the citizens of Pittsburgh, not Paris," was his signature line from the speech. Peduto told the local Pittsburgh press he was "personally offended" by the Trump's speech.


Bloomberg Rips Trump for Not Taking Action on Climate Change

U.S. News

Bloomberg's film gets its name from Trump. When the president withdrew the United States from the Paris climate agreement in 2017, he said it was because he was elected to "represent the citizens of Pittsburgh, not Paris." But Trump was quickly rebuked by Pittsburgh's mayor, Bill Peduto, who said the decision was "disastrous for our planet, for cities such as Pittsburgh" and a step that "has made America weaker."


U.S. mayors and governors defy Trump, will stick to Paris agreement anyway

Mashable

Cities and states across the U.S. will keep fighting climate change, despite President Donald Trump's decision to withdraw the country from the Paris Climate Agreement. Local leaders from across the country say they're not backing down from America's commitments under the historic climate accord. In recent days governors and nearly 200 mayors -- from small towns to megacities -- have vowed to collectively reduce U.S. greenhouse gas emissions and adopt clean energy technologies. Their swift response offers more than just a dose of cheerful optimism. It signals that America's hard-fought progress on climate issues won't be so easily dismantled just because climate deniers and fossil fuel industry allies hold the top seats in the U.S. government, observers said.


States step into void left by exit from Paris climate accord

PBS NewsHour

California Governor Jerry Brown is one of dozens of local leaders who have pledged to fill the void left by President Donald Trump's withdrawal from the Paris climate accord. In announcing his decision to withdraw the United States from the Paris climate accord, President Donald Trump said Thursday that he was "elected to represent the citizens of Pittsburgh, not Paris." The Democratic mayor of Pittsburgh immediately shot back on Twitter: "As the Mayor of Pittsburgh, I can assure you that we will follow the guidelines of the Paris Agreement for our people, our economy & future," Mayor Bill Peduto tweeted. As the Mayor of Pittsburgh, I can assure you that we will follow the guidelines of the Paris Agreement for our people, our economy & future. A number of city and state leaders quickly echoed Peduto's response.