Google reduces Cloud latency with updated Andromeda SDN stack

ZDNet

Google on Wednesday took the wraps off latest version of its Andromeda, the a software-defined network (SDN) stack that underpins the Google Cloud Platform (GCP). With this release, packets on the network are able to securely bypass the hypervisor and go directly to the Andromeda software packet processor. This should reduce latency between Compute Engine VMs by 40 percent over the previous version of Andromeda. Since Google launched Andromeda in 2014, it's been able to reduce Compute Engine latency by nearly a factor of eight. "Without having to do anything, [customers'] code in some cases will run noticeably faster and better," Google engineering fellow Amin Vadhat told ZDNet.


5G: What IT leaders need to know

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The basics of 5G start simply: 5G stands for the telecom providers' fifth-generation technology. You already knew that, or perhaps don't need to know that – the semantics aren't what will impact your business. You also already know 5G's overarching promise: It will be faster than previous generations. It's the business impacts that may not yet be as clear-cut. Experts generally concur this is more a matter of when than if.


Supporting humans and networks: AI and machine learning - Bridgeworks

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In this piece, we speak to ITProPortal about the overarching fear that AI and Machine learning are going to take over people's jobs and the counter argument. Humans make mistakes – that's part of our nature, and by using AI and machine learning the risks associated with human intervention can be removed, which could include unexpected network downtime due to the poor manual configuring of a wide-area network (WAN). Thankfully, the concepts of AI and machine learning in IT networking are not science fiction. Rather than making us weaker, they can make us stronger and enable us to increase our performance. They are no Armageddon; they are an enabler that can permit organisations to do more with fewer resources.


Zero-latency video gives drones an upgrade

ZDNet

Make it faster, look for applications. That's been the market strategy of Amimon, founded in 2004 to get rid of latency in wireless video transmission. So far, Hollywood and hospitals have been Amimon's big customers. But first-person-view (FPV) drone racing (it's a thing, and it's pretty stunning to watch) is growing in popularity. The sport requires precision control in real-time, and latency leads to crashes.


Supporting humans and networks: AI and machine learning

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There is an overarching fear that Artificial Intelligence (AI) and Machine Learning are going to take over people's jobs, but there is a counter argument that their main purpose is to support humans as enabling technologies. However, organisations that don't train up their staff now to learn new skills may find themselves left behind. This includes IT, which is of increasingly strategic importance to most organisations today. Both technologies are becoming a fundamental part of our lives, and with the advent of semi-autonomous and autonomous vehicles they will become more so – both in consumer and enterprise applications. SD-WANs are very good at the branch office level, but as technology moves forward data volumes are going increase and the time to intelligence will need to shrink.