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Google's AI just cracked the game that supposedly no computer could beat

#artificialintelligence

Computers have slowly started to encroach on activities we previously believed only the brilliantly sophisticated human brain could handle. IBM's Deep Blue supercomputer beat Grand Master Garry Kasparov at chess in 1997, and in 2011 IBM's Watson beat former human winners at the quiz game Jeopardy. But the ancient board game Go has long been one of the major goals of artificial intelligence research. It's understood to be one of the most difficult games for computers to handle due to the sheer number of possible moves a player can make at any given point. Researchers at Google DeepMind, the Alphabet-owned artificial intelligence research company, announced today that it had created an artificial intelligence system that has beat a professional Go player at the game.


Can YOU beat a computer at chess? Interactive tool lets you play against an AI and see exactly what its thinking

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Artificial intelligence has shown what it can do when facing off against humans in ancient board games, with Deep Blue and Alpha Go already proving their worth on the world stage. While computers playing chess is nothing new, a new online version of the ancient game lifts the veil of AI to let players see what the AI is thinking. You make your move and then see the computer comes to life, calculating thousands of possible counter moves – but if you are terrible at chess to begin with, it probably won't help you much. Thinking Machine 6 is the latest in a line of AI-based concept art, with the third version a permanent installation at the Museum of Modern Art in New York. Created by computer scientist and artist Martin Wattenberg and Marek Walczak, the last three versions have been taken online, with contributions from Johanna Kindvall and Fernanda Viégas.


Online chess game lets you see what the computer is thinking

#artificialintelligence

Artificial intelligence has shown what it can do when facing off against humans in ancient board games, with Deep Blue and Alpha Go already proving their worth on the world stage. While computers playing chess is nothing new, an online version of the ancient game lifts the veil of AI to let players see what the AI is thinking. You make your move and then see the computer come to life, calculating thousands of possible counter moves. Thinking Machine 6 is an AI-based concept art piece created by Martin Wattenberg. Rather than making players into chess champions, it shows the AI thinking process.


AlphaGo beats human Go champ in milestone for artificial intelligence

#artificialintelligence

First went checkers, then fell chess. Now, a computer program has defeated the world's top player in the ancient east Asian board game of Go -- a major milestone for artificial intelligence that brings to a close the era of board games as benchmarks in computing. At the Four Seasons Hotel in Seoul, Google DeepMind's AlphaGo capped a 3-0 week on Saturday against Lee Sedol, a giant of the game. Lee and AlphaGo were to play again Sunday and Tuesday, but with AlphaGo having already clinched victory in the five-game match, the results are in and history has been made. It was a feat that experts had thought was still years away.


Go champion Lee Sedol scores first win against Google's DeepMind AlphaGo AI

Daily Mail - Science & tech

A human Go player has scored his first victory over an artificial intelligence computer program after'finding weaknesses' in the software. Google's AlphaGo computer had previously managed to win three games against Go world champion Lee Sedol in the five game match. This meant the company's DeepMind artificial intelligence program won the 1 million ( 706,388) prize for the match. South Korean professional Go player Lee Sedol puts the first stone against Google's artificial intelligence program (pictured), which he later went on to win in 180 moves. On Saturday Facebook chief executive Marc Zuckerberg, who is developing his own AI personal assistant technology, congratulated the Google team on their victory.