What Holding Back Machine Learning in Healthcare - Amit Ray

#artificialintelligence

What is holding back the large scale implementation of machine learning systems in healthcare and precision medicine? In this article Dr. Amit Ray, explains the key obstacles and challenges of implementing large-scale machine learning systems in healthcare. Dr. Ray argued that lack of deeper integration, incomplete understanding of the underlying molecular processes of disease it is intended to treat, may limit the progress of implementing large-scale machine learning based reliable systems in healthcare. Here, nine obstacles of present day machine learning systems in healthcare are discussed. Recently, machine learning algorithms, especially deep learning has shown impressive performance in many areas of medical science, especially in classifying imaging data in different clinical domains.


Artificial Intelligence in Clinical Health Care Applications: Viewpoint

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

The idea of Artificial Intelligence (AI) has a long history. It turned out, however, that reaching intelligence at human levels is more complicated than originally anticipated. Currently we are experiencing a renewed interest in AI, fueled by an enormous increase in computing power and an even larger increase in data, in combination with improved AI technologies like deep learning. Healthcare is considered the next domain to be revolutionized by Artificial Intelligence. While AI approaches are excellently suited to develop certain algorithms, for biomedical applications there are specific challenges. We propose recommendations to improve AI projects in the biomedical space and especially clinical healthcare.


Precision Medicine as an Accelerator for Next Generation Cognitive Supercomputing

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

In the past several years, we have taken advantage of a number of opportunities to advance the intersection of next generation high-performance computing AI and big data technologies through partnerships in precision medicine. Today we are in the throes of piecing together what is likely the most unique convergence of medical data and computer technologies. But more deeply, we observe that the traditional paradigm of computer simulation and prediction needs fundamental revision. This is the time for a number of reasons. We will review what the drivers are, why now, how this has been approached over the past several years, and where we are heading.


A Report to ARPA on Twenty-First Century Intelligent Systems

AI Magazine

The purpose of the meeting was to assist ARPA in defining an agenda for foundational AI research. Prior to the meeting, the fellows and officers of AAAI, as well as the report committee members, were asked to recommend areas in which major research thrusts could yield significant scientific gain--with high potential impact on DOD applications--over the next ten years. At the meeting, these suggestions and their relevance to current national needs and challenges in computing were discussed and debated. An initial draft of this report was circulated to the fellows and officers. The final report has benefited greatly from their comments and from textual revisions contributed by Joseph Halpern, Fernando Pereira, and Dana Nau. Computer systems are becoming commonplace; indeed, they are almost ubiquitous. We find them central to the functioning of most business, governmental, military, environmental, and healthcare organizations. They are also a part of many educational and training ...


A Report to ARPA on Twenty-First Century Intelligent Systems

AI Magazine

This report stems from an April 1994 meeting, organized by AAAI at the suggestion of Steve Cross and Gio Wiederhold.1 The purpose of the meeting was to assist ARPA in defining an agenda for foundational AI research. Prior to the meeting, the fellows and officers of AAAI, as well as the report committee members, were asked to recommend areas in which major research thrusts could yield significant scientific gain -- with high potential impact on DOD applications -- over the next ten years. At the meeting, these suggestions and their relevance to current national needs and challenges in computing were discussed and debated. An initial draft of this report was circulated to the fellows and officers. The final report has benefited greatly from their comments and from textual revisions contributed by Joseph Halpern, Fernando Pereira, and Dana Nau.