Goto

Collaborating Authors

Google autocomplete reveals the most popular searches on countries around Europe

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Google, the all-seeing all-knowing entity, is certainly host to some interesting insights about Europe. Based on the most common searches people have typed in with regards to certain countries, there appear to be some pretty off-the-wall world views. According to Google's autocomplete function, which uses algorithms to suggest search terms based on what you've already started typing, a vast quantity of people write'Wales is better than England' in the search box and'Lithuania is boycotting supermarkets'. Turkey, meanwhile, 'is a Trojan horse'. This map reportedly reveals the most common phrases people type into Google search in regards to different countries in Europe, using the internet giant's'autocomplete ' function A map showing common search suggestions on Google for nations around Europe has been compiled by Citybase.


Microsoft's underwater cloud: First subsea datacenter launched off the coast of Scotland

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Microsoft is testing a shipping-container-sized datacenter that will provide cloud services from the bottom of the ocean. The years-long'Project Natick' effort recently moved into its second phase of development, with a prototype deployed to the seafloor near Scotland's Orkney Islands to process workloads. Given the density of populations along the world's coasts, Microsoft says subsea datacenters could make for more efficient web browsing, with the ability to support smoother video streaming and gameplay. Microsoft is testing a shipping-container-sized datacenter that will provide cloud services from the bottom of the ocean. The years-long'Project Natick' effort recently moved into its second phase of development Microsoft's 40-foot-long Northern Isles datacenter sits roughly 117 feet beneath the surface.


Google search: Android app now saves queries if you have bad signal and produces results when internet returns

The Independent - Tech

Google has announced an update to its search app for Android, designed to make spotty connections easier to deal with. Whether on a rural road, in a train tunnel or a lift, we've all tried to perform a Google search in an area with patchy mobile signal, proceeding to land on a broken page instead of that familiar blue and white list of results. Until now, the only course of action had been to wait for your phone's signal bars to fill up before performing the search again. Google celebrates Walter Cronkite's 100th birthday Google celebrates William Morris' 182 birthday with a doodle showcasing his most famous designs Google celebrates Valentine's Day with a romantic Doodle Google celebrate Dmitri Mendeleev's 182nd birthday Google Doodle celebrates 90 years since the first demonstration of television or "the televisor" to the public Google marks St Andrew's Day with doodle featuring Scotland's flag and Loch Ness monster Google marks the 41st anniversary of the discovery of'Lucy', the name given to a collection of fossilised bones that once made up the skeleton of a hominid from the Australopithecus afarensis species, who lived in Ethiopia 3.2 million years ago Google celebrates Halloween using an interactive doodle game "Global Candy Cup" However, the latest version of the Google app on Android saves your search queries whenever you have no signal, automatically delivering your results as soon as it detects a connection again. It's a slick solution that should save your eyeballs from lengthy periods spent glaring at your phone's signal bars.


The time EVERYONE craves takeout: Researchers find people across the globe want food at 7pm and 2am

Daily Mail - Science & tech

You're not the only one who tends to crave takeout food late at night. Researchers from the University of Aberdeen in Scotland collected Google search entries from across the globe and looked for commonalities, specifically looking at searches during two one-week periods in September 2016 and March 2017. They found that 7 p.m. and 2 a.m. are the most common times for ordering out food, such as pizza or Chinese, in the US, UK, Canada, Australia and India. You're not the only one who tends to crave takeout food late at night. The research, published Wednesday in the journal Royal Society Open Science, also theorizes that these behaviors may be a result of our early ancestors.


Microsoft drops data center into the sea: 'It will keep working for five years'

ZDNet

Microsoft has dropped a 40-foot long data-center pod onto the seafloor off the coast from the European Marine Energy Centre in Orkney, north of Scotland. That's a fairly remote location, but Microsoft's thinking behind phase two of its data-center-in-the-sea research, Project Natick, is to bring its cloud servers closer to where people live. Since half the world's population lives within 120 miles of the coast, it thinks offshore data centers could be an efficient, low-latency way of delivering AI applications and gaming content to end users. Microsoft dropped a slightly smaller 30-foot Natick pod off the coast of California in 2016 to test whether it could run Azure services from the seabed. Microsoft designed the pod to operate without maintenance for up to five years -- about the time it would take before the servers inside would be retired anyway.