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Cats and dogs can remember events that happened years ago and respond to memory prompts

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Cats and dogs can remember events that happened years ago and respond to memory prompts just like humans, a study has concluded. Researchers from Denmark surveyed cat and dog owners about the occasions on which their pets had shown signs of remembering a specific past event. The team found that the majority of cats and dogs seem to have a so-called episodic memory -- one often triggered by cues like locations, just like our memories are. In their studies, Psychologists Amy Lewis and Dorthe Berntsen of Aarhus University in Denmark surveyed a total of 375 cat and dog owners who had cared for their pet for more than six months. They asked whether each owner felt that their pet had ever remembered a past event or events -- what experts call'episodic' memory.


Women form stronger emotional bonds with their pet cats than men

Daily Mail - Science & tech

That's according to a study into felines and their owners, which found that women form stronger bonds with pets because they are the more empathetic of the sexes. Women believe their animals themselves to be more empathetic and are more likely to smile at their cat, talk to their cat and explain the world to them, scientists found. That's according to a study into felines and their owners, which found that women form stronger bonds with their pets because they are more empathetic than men (stock image) The study, from the Eötvös Loránd University in Hungary, said women are more likely than men to initiate almost all types of interaction with their cats. Led by Dr Péter Pongrácz, in the university's Department of Ethology, the authors state: 'Women were found in general to have more intense connections with their pets. 'Their interactions involve more repeating, complex behavioural patterns and women are also more empathic with their pets.'


The sound of a whimpering dog tugs at our heartstrings just as much as a crying baby, study shows

Daily Mail - Science & tech

If you're powerless against the whimpers of a dog, you certainly are not alone. A new study assessing the impact of dogs' distress sounds has found that pet-owners consider these vocalizations to be just as sad as a crying baby. The trend even showed up among cat owners, who were also moved more by the whines of a dog than a cat. Researchers say the effect speaks to the bond between humans and our animal companions, highlighting a unique emotional sensitivity to the needs of our pets. In the study, researchers examined the responses of 500 young adults – including dog and cat owners, and people with no pets – when faced with different types of vocalizations.


People kept bunnies as pets before the 1st century

Daily Mail - Science & tech

A popular myth about rabbit domestication involving the Pope and hungry seventh century monks has been debunked by experts.


Study pinpoints genetic marker that makes dogs social

Daily Mail - Science & tech

While the bond between humans and dogs now seems a natural part of life, a look at their closest living ancestor is a reminder that things weren't always that way. A new study has identified a genetic marker in dogs that sets them apart from wolves when it comes to human interaction, suggesting dogs developed a genetic condition through domestication that causes them to be so sociable. According to the researchers, this marker is the same found in people with Williams-Beuren syndrome – a condition which essentially causes people to love everyone. A new study has identified a genetic marker in dogs that sets them apart from wolves when it comes to human interaction, suggesting dogs may have developed a genetic condition through domestication that causes them to be so sociable. A genetic analysis of the world's oldest known dog remains has revealed that dogs were domesticated in a single event by humans living in Eurasia.