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Nonprofits still heavily rely on email for donations — and it's not paying off

Mashable

Nonprofits don't need to be complete digital masterminds to find success, but they do need to apply a digital lens to their work to stay relevant -- especially if they want to rake in donations. The proof is in the 2016 M R Benchmarks Study, an annual report published by communications agency M R and the Nonprofit Technology Network, which will be released in full on Wednesday. The analysis of more than 100 leading nonprofits, 2.8 billion emails and 69.4 million subscribers shows that nonprofits still heavily rely on email to promote their causes, when they should be giving more attention to mobile and social media. In 2015 alone, nonprofits sent the average email subscriber a staggering 49 messages to gain their attention, but email open rates, click-through rates and response rates all declined over the past year. About 13% of the 481 million in online donations in 2015 came from mobile.


Voluntary 'Ag Tag' Donations in Kentucky Total $612,106

U.S. News

Kentucky motorists buying or renewing farm vehicle license plates may make voluntary donations up to $10 apiece to the Ag Tag Fund. Voluntary donations are divided equally among Kentucky 4-H, Kentucky FFA and the Kentucky Department of Agriculture. KDA uses its share for promotional programs.


Opt-out organ donation law: Your questions answered

New Scientist

How is the UK organ donation law being changed? People's wishes about organ donation after death are currently gauged on an opt-in basis in most of the UK. That means you can give consent for donation on an online organ donation register. But as in nearly all countries, there are far more people who need a transplant than there are organs available, with several hundred people dying every year in the UK while on the waiting list. In a bid to change that, from next year, in England the system will switch, so that everyone will be assumed to have given consent unless they opt-out.


Dems publicly tout small dollar donations, while quietly courting big dollar donors

FOX News

Following the financial success of Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders' presidential run in 2016, the growing field of Democratic candidates in 2020 are publicly all about the small dollar donations. But as the first quarterly fund-raising deadline comes to a close on Sunday, the candidates in the Democratic field are all also trying to quietly haul in as many big dollar donations as they can get. Sen. Cory Booker, D- N.J., was recently in California for a fundraiser attended by tech bigwigs and venture capitalists, while New York Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand was at the home of a Manhattan investor to gather donations. On Sunday evening, Sen. Kamala Harris, D-Calif., will be in Los Angeles to mix and mingle with Hollywood's heavy-hitters at the home of MGM Motion Picture Group President Jonathan Glickman. In years past, candidates in both major parties would flaunt their big dollar donations – up to $2,800 during the primary season, as stipulated by federal law – as a sign of their formidability and political strength.