Babies who grow up bilingual have better problem-solving skills before they can talk

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Learning a second language when you are young has long been known to boost brainpower. Now researchers have found that the brains of babies exposed to two languages benefit from this extra boost even before they can utter a word. Scientists claim that just growing up in a home or environment where they are listening to more than one language being spoken could improve a child's problem solving skills and memory. Researchers have found that the brains of babies exposed to two languages develop better, even before they can utter a word. They claim that just growing up in a home or environment where they are listening to more than one language being spoken could improve a child's problem solving skills and memory Previous studies suggest that speaking two or more languages from a very young age helps a child's development into adults with more highly refined cognitive skills.


Bilingual babies can distinguish between two languages

Daily Mail

Bilingual babies can accurately process two languages from just 20 months of age, according to a new study. Researchers found infants growing up with two languages have the learning ability to make sense of both of them from just listening. The moment they hear the switch their pupils dilate, researchers found - proving that it does not just blend into gobbledegook. This builds on previous research which found babies who are exposed to two languages have better brain power before they've even uttered a word and end up smarter for life. Researchers found babies infants growing up bilingual have the learning ability to make sense of two languages from just listening.


Scientists find that tots prefer the rambling baby talk of other children to their own parents

Daily Mail

Not listening to mum and dad is a trait developed at an early age according to scientists. Babies prefer to listen to the babbling of fellow infants than the voices of their own parents, a new study has found. The vowel-like sounds, such as the classic'Ba ba ba', resonated 40 per cent more with babies and researchers suggest it makes young children chattier. This helps babies to build their own language skills and to better understand speech. Not listening to mum and dad is a trait developed at an early age, scientists have discovered.


Brain scans may help diagnose dyslexia

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About 10 percent of the U.S. population suffers from dyslexia, a condition that makes learning to read difficult. Dyslexia is usually diagnosed around second grade, but the results of a new study from MIT could help identify those children before they even begin reading, so they can be given extra help earlier. The study, done with researchers at Boston Children's Hospital, found a correlation between poor pre-reading skills in kindergartners and the size of a brain structure that connects two language-processing areas. Previous studies have shown that in adults with poor reading skills, this structure, known as the arcuate fasciculus, is smaller and less organized than in adults who read normally. However, it was unknown if these differences cause reading difficulties or result from lack of reading experience.


Parents, put down your phone! Being distracted while playing with babies causes them to grow up with attention problems

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Fiddling with your phone while playing with your baby could lead to them growing up with a shorter attention span. That's the warning from a group of psychologists who found toddlers find it hard to focus if their parents or other caregivers are distracted while playing with them. The study is the first to show a direct connection between how long a caregiver looks at an object and how long an infant's attention remains focused on that same object. It may also serve as a warning to many parents who juggle work and childcare by keeping a near constant eye on their phone. 'The ability of children to sustain attention is known as a strong indicator for later success in areas such as language acquisition, problem-solving and other key cognitive development milestones,' said Chen Yu of Indiana University who led the study.