US Senator has privacy concerns about Pokémon Go's data collection

PCWorld

The popularity of augmented reality smartphone game Pokémon Go has raised a variety of concerns, including a warning by the National Safety Council, urging drivers not to play the game behind the wheel and asking pedestrians to be careful while playing it. U.S. Senator Al Franken, a strong privacy advocate, has raised the inevitable question about the privacy of the extensive data the game collects from its users, including children, and whether the data is used for other purposes. "I am concerned about the extent to which Niantic may be unnecessarily collecting, using, and sharing a wide range of users' personal information without their appropriate consent," Franken, a Democrat from Minnesota, wrote in a letter Tuesday to John Hanke, the CEO of Niantic, the developer of the game. Citing recent reports and the privacy policy of Pokémon Go, Niantic appears to collect a broad swath of personal information from its players, according to the senator. Ranging from the user's general profile information to their precise location data and device identifiers, "Niantic has access to a significant amount of information, unless users - many of whom are children - opt-out of this collection," Franken wrote.


US Senator Al Franken has privacy concerns about Pokémon Go's data collection

PCWorld

The popularity of augmented reality smartphone game Pokémon Go has raised a variety of concerns, including a warning by the National Safety Council, urging drivers not to play the game behind the wheel and asking pedestrians to be careful while playing it. U.S. Senator Al Franken, a strong privacy advocate, has raised the inevitable question about the privacy of the extensive data the game collects from its users, including children, and whether the data is used for other purposes. "I am concerned about the extent to which Niantic may be unnecessarily collecting, using, and sharing a wide range of users' personal information without their appropriate consent," Franken, a Democrat from Minnesota, wrote in a letter Tuesday to John Hanke, the CEO of Niantic, the developer of the game. Citing recent reports and the privacy policy of Pokémon Go, Niantic appears to collect a broad swath of personal information from its players, according to the senator. Ranging from the user's general profile information to their precise location data and device identifiers, "Niantic has access to a significant amount of information, unless users - many of whom are children - opt-out of this collection," Franken wrote.


Holocaust Museum, Auschwitz want Pokémon Go hunts out

USATODAY - Tech Top Stories

Pokemon Go, a Global Positioning System (GPS) based augmented reality mobile game, is proving to be'enormously' popular since software development company Niantic opened access to it on 06 July in the US. SAN FRANCISCO -- Officials at the Holocaust Museum and Poland's Auschwitz Memorial are calling on Pokémon Go maker Niantic to take their sites off the locations where players can hunt cartoon creatures in the popular augmented reality app, saying it dishonors Holocaust victims. Many players reported seeing the digital Pokémon creatures within the Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington, D.C. The site is also being used as a "PokeStop" for players to get in-game items. Players in the mobile phone game Pokémon Go must capture digital Pokémon characters, which appear hovering over the player's real-world surroundings.


Solar Impulse 2: Sun-powered plane takes off from Cairo on last leg of round-the-world voyage

The Independent - Tech

Nasa has announced that it has found evidence of flowing water on Mars. Scientists have long speculated that Recurring Slope Lineae -- or dark patches -- on Mars were made up of briny water but the new findings prove that those patches are caused by liquid water, which it has established by finding hydrated salts. Several hundred camped outside the London store in Covent Garden. The 6s will have new features like a vastly improved camera and a pressure-sensitive "3D Touch" display


Video game industry pushes back on Trump's violence link, stresses parental tools

USATODAY - Tech Top Stories

The tragic events of the past weekend – back-to-back mass shootings in El Paso, Texas, and Dayton, Ohio leaving at least 31 dead and more than 50 wounded – has reignited the debate over the alleged correlation between video games and violent behavior. "We must stop the glorification of violence in our society," President Trump said in remarks from the White House on Monday. "This includes the gruesome and grisly video games that are now commonplace." Thousands subsequently turned to social media to challenge this claim, citing easy access to assault-style weapons without background checks as the core problem. Video games are immensely popular in several countries that do not see mass shootings, many noted.