Sentiment Analysis with Global Topics and Local Dependency

AAAI Conferences

With the development of Web 2.0, sentiment analysis has now become a popular research problem to tackle. Recently, topic models have been introduced for the simultaneous analysis for topics and the sentiment in a document. These studies, which jointly model topic and sentiment, take the advantage of the relationship between topics and sentiment, and are shown to be superior to traditional sentiment analysis tools. However, most of them make the assumption that, given the parameters, the sentiments of the words in the document are all independent. In our observation, in contrast, sentiments are expressed in a coherent way. The local conjunctive words, such as “and” or “but”, are often indicative of sentiment transitions. In this paper, we propose a major departure from the previous approaches by making two linked contributions. First, we assume that the sentiments are related to the topic in the document, and put forward a joint sentiment and topic model, i.e. Sentiment-LDA. Second, we observe that sentiments are dependent on local context. Thus, we further extend the Sentiment-LDA model to Dependency-Sentiment-LDA model by relaxing the sentiment independent assumption in Sentiment-LDA. The sentiments of words are viewed as a Markov chain in Dependency-Sentiment-LDA. Through experiments, we show that exploiting the sentiment dependency is clearly advantageous, and that the Dependency-Sentiment-LDA is an effective approach for sentiment analysis.


Opinion Context Extraction for Aspect Sentiment Analysis

AAAI Conferences

Sentiment analysis is the computational study of opinionated text and is becoming increasing important to online commercial applications. However, the majority of current approaches determine sentiment by attempting to detect the overall polarity of a sentence, paragraph, or text window, but without any knowledge about the entities mentioned (e.g. restaurant) and their aspects (e.g. price). Aspect-level sentiment analysis of customer feedback data when done accurately can be leveraged to understand strong and weak performance points of businesses and services, and can also support the formulation of critical action steps to improve performance. In this paper we focus on aspect-level sentiment classification, studying the role of opinion context extraction for a given aspect and the extent to which traditional and neural sentiment classifiers benefit when trained using the opinion context text. We propose four methods to aspect context extraction using lexical, syntactic and sentiment co-occurrence knowledge. Further, we evaluate the usefulness of the opinion contexts for aspect-sentiment analysis. Our experiments on benchmark data sets from SemEval and a real-world dataset from the insurance domain suggests that extracting the right opinion context is effective in improving classification performance.Specifically combining syntactical features with sentiment co-occurrence knowledge leads to the best aspect-sentiment classification performance.


Yang

AAAI Conferences

Inspired by recent works in Aspect-Based Sentiment Analysis (ABSA) on product reviews and faced with more complex posts on social media platforms mentioning multiple entities as well as multiple aspects, we define a novel task called Multi-Entity Aspect-Based Sentiment Analysis (ME-ABSA). This task aims at fine-grained sentiment analysis of (entity, aspect) combinations, making the well-studied ABSA task a special case of it. To address the task, we propose an innovative method that models Context memory, Entity memory and Aspect memory, called CEA method. Our experimental results show that our CEA method achieves a significant gain over several baselines, including the state-of-the-art method for the ABSA task, and their enhanced versions, on datasets for ME-ABSA and ABSA tasks. The in-depth analysis illustrates the significant advantage of the CEA method over baseline methods for several hard-to-predict post types. Furthermore, we show that the CEA method is capable of generalizing to new (entity, aspect) combinations with little loss of accuracy. This observation indicates that data annotation in real applications can be largely simplified.


Araujo

AAAI Conferences

Sentiment analysis became a hot topic, specially with the amount of opinions available in social media data. With the increasing interest in this theme, several methods have been proposed in the literature. Recent efforts have showed that there is no single method that always achieves the best prediction performance for different datasets. Additionally, novel methods have not being extensively compared with other methods and across different datasets, specially methods that are not designed to the English language. Consequently, researchers tend to accept any popular method as a valid methodology to measure sentiments, a practice that is usual in science. In this context, we propose iFeel 2.0, an online web system that implements 19 sentence-level sentiment analysis methods and allows users to easily label a dataset with all of them.