Automation Nightmare: Philosopher Warns We Are Creating a World Without Consciousness

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Recently, a conference on artificial intelligence, tantalizingly titled "Superintelligence: Science or Fiction?", was hosted by the Future of Life Institute, which works to promote "optimistic visions of the future". The conference offered a range of opinions on the subject from a variety of experts, including Elon Musk of Tesla Motors and SpaceX, futurist Ray Kurzweil, Demis Hassabis of MIT's DeepMind, neuroscientist and author Sam Harris, philosopher Nick Bostrom, philosopher and cognitive scientist David Chalmers, Skype co-founder Jaan Tallinn, as well as computer scientists Stuart Russell and Bart Selman. The discussion was led by MIT cosmologist Max Tegmark. The conversation's topics centered on the future benefits and risks of artificial superintelligence, with everyone generally agreeing that it's only a matter of time before AI becomes paramount in our lives. Eventually, AI will surpass human intelligence, with the ensuing risks and transformations.


Automation Nightmare: Philosopher Warns We Are Creating a World Without Consciousness

#artificialintelligence

Recently, a conference on artificial intelligence, tantalizingly titled "Superintelligence: Science or Fiction?", was hosted by the Future of Life Institute, which works to promote "optimistic visions of the future". The conference offered a range of opinions on the subject from a variety of experts, including Elon Musk of Tesla Motors and SpaceX, futurist Ray Kurzweil, Demis Hassabis of Google's DeepMind, neuroscientist and author Sam Harris, philosopher Nick Bostrom, philosopher and cognitive scientist David Chalmers, Skype co-founder Jaan Tallinn, as well as computer scientists Stuart Russell and Bart Selman. The discussion was led by MIT cosmologist Max Tegmark. The conversation's topics centered on the future benefits and risks of artificial superintelligence, with everyone generally agreeing that it's only a matter of time before AI becomes paramount in our lives. Eventually, AI will surpass human intelligence, with the ensuing risks and transformations.


Replication of the Hard Problem of Consciousness in AI and Bio-AI: An Early Conceptual Framework

AAAI Conferences

AI could in principle replicate consciousness (Hconsciousness) in its first-person form (as described by Chalmers in the hard problem of consciousness.) If we can understand first-person consciousness in clear terms, we can provide an algorithm for it; if we have such algorithm, in principle we can build it. There are two questions that this argument opens. First, whether we ever will understand H-consciousness in clear terms. Second, whether we can build H-consciousness in inorganic substance. If organic substance is required, we would need to clearly grasp the difference between building a machine out of organic substance (Bio-AI) and just modifying a biological organism.


The idea that everything from spoons to stones is conscious is gaining academic credibility

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This sounds like easily-dismissible bunkum, but as traditional attempts to explain consciousness continue to fail, the "panpsychist" view is increasingly being taken seriously by credible philosophers, neuroscientists, and physicists, including figures such as neuroscientist Christof Koch and physicist Roger Penrose. "Why should we think common sense is a good guide to what the universe is like?" says Philip Goff, a philosophy professor at Central European University in Budapest, Hungary. "Einstein tells us weird things about the nature of time that counters common sense; quantum mechanics runs counter to common sense. David Chalmers, a philosophy of mind professor at New York University, laid out the "hard problem of consciousness" in 1995, demonstrating that there was still no answer to the question of what causes consciousness. Traditionally, two dominant perspectives, materialism and dualism, have provided a framework for solving this problem.


Can Robots Become Conscious?

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Can you put it in a machine? And if you did, how could you ever know for sure? Unlike any other scientific topics, consciousness -- the first-person awareness of the world around -- is truly in the eye of the beholder. I know I am conscious. But how do I know that you are? Could it be that my colleagues, my friends, my editors, my wife, my child, all the people I see on the streets of New York are actually just mindless automatons who merely act as if they were conscious human beings?