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Report: Palantir Helped JPMorgan Spy on Employees

Slate

Bloomberg published an exposé on Thursday that in part reported on how data firm Palantir effectively used JPMorgan as a testing ground to develop a surveillance analytics tool for the financial sector. The tool reportedly reviewed private information, like GPS locations and browser histories, to keep tabs on the bank's employees. Billionaire venture capitalist Peter Thiel founded Palantir in 2004, along with current CEO Alexander Karp, to develop programs that could analyze data gathered by the Pentagon and CIA in Iraq and Afghanistan. While the software tools don't actually collect any data themselves, they do help users to recognize connections between pieces of data and to predict a surveillance subject's future behavior. According to Bloomberg, the company began working with JPMorgan almost 10 years ago to assist the bank's insider threat group, which at the time was led by a former Secret Service agent named Peter Cavicchia III.


how-peter-thiels-secretive-data-company-pushed-into-policing

WIRED

"Palantir Law Enforcement provides robust, built-in privacy and civil liberties protections, including granular access controls and advanced data retention capabilities," its website reads. Ethereum Is Coding's New Wild West In one of the largest systematic investigations of the company to date, Backchannel filed dozens of public records requests with police forces across America. All 50 states have public records laws providing access to contracts, documents, and emails of local and government bodies. Palantir's software has been deployed by police departments in Los Angeles (LAPD), Long Beach (LBPD), and Burbank; sheriff's departments in Sacramento, Ventura, and Los Angeles Counties (LASD); the state's highway patrol; and homeland security "fusion centers" run by local departments in Orange County, San Francisco, Silicon Valley, San Diego and Los Angeles.


Palantir has secretly been using New Orleans to test its predictive policing technology

#artificialintelligence

In May and June 2013, when New Orleans' murder rate was the sixth-highest in the United States, the Orleans Parish district attorney handed down two landmark racketeering indictments against dozens of men accused of membership in two violent Central City drug trafficking gangs, 3NG and the 110ers. Members of both gangs stood accused of committing 25 murders as well as several attempted killings and armed robberies.


Palantir has secretly been using New Orleans to test its predictive policing technology

@machinelearnbot

In May and June 2013, when New Orleans' murder rate was the sixth-highest in the United States, the Orleans Parish district attorney handed down two landmark racketeering indictments against dozens of men accused of membership in two violent Central City drug trafficking gangs, 3NG and the 110ers. Members of both gangs stood accused of committing 25 murders as well as several attempted killings and armed robberies.


Why Humanitarians Are Worried About Palantir's New Partnership With the U.N.

Slate

Big data analysis is showing up everywhere, and the world of humanitarian aid is no exception. Organizations, from gigantic aid agencies to small NGOs, have been exploring ways they can use data conclusions to better help people in need. And these aid organizations are increasingly working directly with tech companies to help them make sense of the data that they collect. Still, other aid tech specialists (including myself) caution that these collaborations, if done without adequate oversight, can create ethical issues and expose vulnerable people's data to surveillance and appropriation by powerful interests. On Feb. 5, the debate about such collaborations reached a new level of intensity: The World Food Programme, a United Nations aid agency and the world's largest humanitarian organization addressing hunger and food security, announced that it was launching a five-year, $45 million partnership with the infamous data-analytics firm Palantir.