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Live From ILTACON Part II: Developments In Legal Technology

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The sentiment across the legal technology community is that this year's ILTACON was a smashing success. More than 1500 members and 1700 exhibitors attended the conference in Orlando this year. Their vibe was energetic and people were definitely in good spirits. The need for and growth of technology continues and that's ultimately why we were there. We spent time in the exhibit hall and demo rooms talking to companies in the legal technology space to identify what's new and interesting.


Live From ILTACON Part II: Developments In Legal Technology

#artificialintelligence

The sentiment across the legal technology community is that this year's ILTACON was a smashing success. More than 1500 members and 1700 exhibitors attended the conference in Orlando this year. Their vibe was energetic and people were definitely in good spirits. The need for and growth of technology continues and that's ultimately why we were there. We spent time in the exhibit hall and demo rooms talking to companies in the legal technology space to identify what's new and interesting.


10 Legal Trends to Watch for in 2017

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The explosive growth of ESI has made for more costly, complex litigation and driven changes to the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure (FRCP). These changes will continue to shape e-discovery, and roles in e-discovery, technology and litigation support will continue to emerge. Median annual spend on corporate litigation expenditures Norton Rose "2016 Litigation Trends Annual Survey" $1,000,000 Special Eurobarometer 431 - Data protection, June 2015 of people say their explicit approval should be required in all cases before their data is collected and processed As 2016 winds down, here's a quick summary of the top legal industry trends, new and old, to watch for in 2017. LEGAL TRENDS E-DISCOVERY CHANGES TO WATCH FOR IN 2017 Artificial intelligence (AI) gets smarter every day. Its potential to automate tasks like TAR, map judicial predispositions to predict rulings or analyze opposing counsel tactics to help prepare defenses continue to grow.


AI & The Law: Q&A With Jay Leib

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I started my career in 1997 with the advent of modern eDiscovery. In fact, it was not even called eDiscovery when I developed my first applications for processing data in the context of eDiscovery. I founded Advocate Solutions, Inc around that same time and we developed Discovery Cracker - one of the first eDiscovery processing applications. Producing documents was a different game back then as the price for processing was incredibly high. I Joined kCura, known for its legal database application Relativity, in 2010 and saw firsthand how fast the amount of data involved eDiscovery was rising.


How artificial intelligence is transforming the legal profession

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How artificial intelligence is transforming the legal profession The future of the legal profession began 20 years ago. The technology boom was just beginning with the emergence of email and personal computers. Jay Leib was working for Record Technologies Inc. as director of software sales and training in 1999, and the company was scanning documents into databases for clients. At one point the company printed and scanned legal documents related to a lawsuit with Microsoft. Leib thought that was inefficient, a waste of time and paper. So he and his business partner, Dan Roth, decided to create a program that would help lawyers manage electronic documents for litigation. Their idea led them to purchase an e-discovery application. By 2000, Leib and his partner launched their own creation, Discovery Cracker. "We saw a gap in the marketplace," Leib says. Lawyers need tools to keep up with it." Instead of wading through piles of paper, lawyers now deal with terabytes of data and hundreds of thousands of documents. E-discovery, legal research and document review are more sophisticated due to the abundance of data. So while working as chief strategy officer at kCura in Chicago, Leib saw a need again in the market. "For years, lawyers have been stuck with antiquated tools that focus primarily … on Boolean search. Better tools are needed to truly understand data." "What is the future of the industry? We thought about it," he says. "There were whistleblowers in their companies who knew what was going on, and the unstructured data contained the stories. Companies could detect potential problems early on, provide alternatives to counsel and C-suite, and understand their exposure. It would prevent unnecessary legal spend and mitigate risk, thus protecting the company's brand and shareholder value." In 2013, he and Roth, a professor and head of the cognitive computing group at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, created NexLP, a company using artificial intelligence to analyze data and identify trends. A REVOLUTION BEGINS Artificial intelligence is changing the way lawyers think, the way they do business and the way they interact with clients. Artificial intelligence is more than legal technology.