Nvidia CEO: "Software is eating the world, but AI is going to eat software"

#artificialintelligence

Tech companies and investors have recently been piling money into artificial intelligence--and plenty has been trickling down to chip maker Nvidia. The company's revenues have climbed as it has started making hardware customized for machine-learning algorithms and use cases such as autonomous cars. At the company's annual developer conference in San Jose, California, this week, the company's CEO Jensen Huang spoke to MIT Technology Review about how the machine-learning revolution is just starting. Nvidia has benefitted from a rapid explosion of investment in machine learning from tech companies. Can this rapid growth in the use cases for machine learning continue?


Nvidia CEO: "Software is eating the world, but AI is going to eat software"

#artificialintelligence

Nvidia has benefitted from a rapid explosion of investment in machine learning from tech companies. Can this rapid growth in the use cases for machine learning continue? Recent research results from applying machine learning to diagnosis are impressive (see "An AI Ophthalmologist Shows How Machine Learning May Transform Medicine"). Your chips are already driving some cars: all Tesla vehicles now use Nvidia's Drive PX 2 computer to power the Autopilot feature that automates highway driving.


Nvidia CEO: Software Is Eating the World, but AI Is Going to Eat Software

#artificialintelligence

Tech companies and investors have recently been piling money into artificial intelligence--and plenty has been trickling down to chip maker Nvidia. The company's revenues have climbed as it has started making hardware customized for machine-learning algorithms and use cases such as autonomous cars. At the company's annual developer conference in San Jose, California, this week, the company's CEO Jensen Huang spoke to MIT Technology Review about how the machine-learning revolution is just starting. Nvidia has benefitted from a rapid explosion of investment in machine learning from tech companies. Can this rapid growth in the use cases for machine learning continue?


Battle to Provide Chips for the AI Boom Heats Up

MIT Technology Review

Jensen Huang beamed out over a packed conference hall in San Jose, California, on Wednesday as he announced his company's new chip aimed at accelerating artificial intelligence algorithms. But metaphorically speaking, the CEO of chip maker Nvidia was looking over his shoulder. Nvidia's profits and stock have surged over the past few years because the graphics processors it invented to power gaming and graphics production have enabled many recent breakthroughs in machine learning (see "10 Breakthrough Technologies 2013: Deep Learning"). But as investment in artificial intelligence soars, Huang's company now faces competition from Intel, Google, and others working on their own AI chips. At Nvidia's annual developer conference on Wednesday, Huang carefully avoided mentioning any competitors by name as he introduced Nvidia's latest chip, named the Tesla V100.


How a gaming chip could someday save your life

#artificialintelligence

Jensen Huang, the billionaire CEO of Nvidia, has made a fortune by supplying the hardware used for artificial-intelligence algorithms. He's now betting that AI is about to become an indispensable part of medicine. In the early 1990s, Huang recognized that the limitations of general-purpose computer chips and the rise of computer gaming would be likely to increase demand for specialized graphics processors. During the late '90s and 2000s, the company he cofounded found huge success making high-end graphics chips for gamers. More recently Huang and Nvidia have ridden a different technology wave, supplying the hardware used to train and run the deep-learning algorithms that have been key to a recent renaissance in artificial intelligence.