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Stephen Hawking has a terrifying warning about Artificial Intelligence and the future of humanity

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Stephen Hawking has warned artificial intelligence could be the greatest disaster in human history if it is not properly managed. The world famous physicist said AI could bring about serious peril in the creation of powerful autonomous weapons and novel ways for those in power to oppress and control the masses. Hawking suggested AI could be the last event in the history of our civilisation if humanity did not learn to cope with the risks it posed. But the cosmologist and professor also said AI could have great benefits and potentially erase poverty and disease. Actress Gemma Arterton attends'Their Finest' Mayor's Centrepiece Gala screening during the 60th BFI London Film Festival at Odeon Leicester Square Actress Nicole Kidman attends the'Lion' American Express Gala screening during the 60th BFI London Film Festival at Odeon Leicester Square A woman holds up a Prince symbol during the Prince Official Tribute concert at Xcel Energy Center in St. Paul, Minnesota Chaka Khan perform during the'Official Prince Tribute-A Celebration of Life and Music' concert at Xcel Energy Center in St Paul, Minnesota Jessie J performs during the'Official Prince Tribute-A Celebration of Life and Music,' concert Nicole Scherzinger, former lead singer for the Pussycat Dolls, performs during a tribute to late musician Prince, at the Xcel Energy Center in St. Paul, Minnesota U.S. Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton sits with Ellen DeGeneres of the Ellen Show in Burbank, Los Angeles, California Writer/film subject Jonas Mekas takes part in a Q&A following the'I Had Nowhere To Go' screening Writer/film subject Jonas Mekas and film critic Amy Taubin take part in a Q&A following the'I Had Nowhere To Go' screening during the 54th New York Film Festival at The Film Society of Lincoln Center Gina Miller arriving at the High Court in London, where she is leading a legal challenge over Theresa May's right to trigger article 50 without a vote in Parliament Director Paolo Sorrentino and Jude Law walk the red carpet at'The Young Pope' premiere at The Space Cinema Actress Michelle Williams attends the'Manchester By The Sea' International Premiere screening during the 60th BFI London Film Festival at Odeon Leicester Square Ellie Goulding joins'Nike Training Club' at Nike Sydney in Sydney, Australia Bono and Larry Mullen Jr. of U2 perform during the UCSF Benioff Children's Hospital benefit concert at the Cow Palace in San Francisco, California "We spend a great deal of time studying history, which, let's face it, is mostly the history of stupidity.



Stephen Hawking - Wikipedia

@machinelearnbot

Stephen William Hawking CH CBE FRS FRSA (8 January 1942 – 14 March 2018)[14][15] was an English theoretical physicist, cosmologist, author and Director of Research at the Centre for Theoretical Cosmology within the University of Cambridge.[16][17] His scientific works included a collaboration with Roger Penrose on gravitational singularity theorems in the framework of general relativity and the theoretical prediction that black holes emit radiation, often called Hawking radiation. Hawking was the first to set out a theory of cosmology explained by a union of the general theory of relativity and quantum mechanics. He was a vigorous supporter of the many-worlds interpretation of quantum mechanics.[18][19] Hawking was an Honorary Fellow of the Royal Society of Arts (FRSA), a lifetime member of the Pontifical Academy of Sciences, and a recipient of the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the highest civilian award in the United States. In 2002, Hawking was ranked number 25 in the BBC's poll of the 100 Greatest Britons. He was the Lucasian Professor of Mathematics at the University of Cambridge between 1979 and 2009 and achieved commercial success with works of popular science in which he discusses his own theories and cosmology in general. His book, A Brief History of Time, appeared on the British Sunday Times best-seller list for a record-breaking 237 weeks. Hawking had a rare early-onset slow-progressing form of motor neurone disease (also known as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and Lou Gehrig's disease), that gradually paralysed him over the decades.[20][21] Even after the loss of his speech, he was still able to communicate through a speech-generating device, initially through use of a hand-held switch, and eventually by using a single cheek muscle. Hawking was born on 8 January 1942[22] in Oxford to Frank (1905–1986) and Isobel Hawking (née Walker; 1915–2013).[23][24] Despite their families' financial constraints, both parents attended the University of Oxford, where Frank read medicine and Isobel read Philosophy, Politics and Economics.[24] The two met shortly after the beginning of the Second World War at a medical research institute where Isobel was working as a secretary and Frank was working as a medical researcher.[24][26] They lived in Highgate; but, as London was being bombed in those years, Isobel went to Oxford to give birth in greater safety.[27] Hawking had two younger sisters, Philippa and Mary, and an adopted brother, Edward.[28] In 1950, when Hawking's father became head of the division of parasitology at the National Institute for Medical Research, Hawking and his family moved to St Albans, Hertfordshire.[29][30]


The 2018 Survey: AI and the Future of Humans

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"Please think forward to the year 2030. Analysts expect that people will become even more dependent on networked artificial intelligence (AI) in complex digital systems. Some say we will continue on the historic arc of augmenting our lives with mostly positive results as we widely implement these networked tools. Some say our increasing dependence on these AI and related systems is likely to lead to widespread difficulties. Our question: By 2030, do you think it is most likely that advancing AI and related technology systems will enhance human capacities and empower them? That is, most of the time, will most people be better off than they are today? Or is it most likely that advancing AI and related technology systems will lessen human autonomy and agency to such an extent that most people will not be better off than the way things are today? Please explain why you chose the answer you did and sketch out a vision of how the human-machine/AI collaboration will function in 2030.


Bridging the Gaps – "The Technology Trap" and the Future of Work with Dr Carl Frey

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An intriguing set of questions that is being explored by researchers across the globe and is being discussed and brainstormed in various organisations and think tanks is: "what is the future of work"; "how forthcoming AI and Automation revolution will impact on the nature and structure of work"; and "what would be the impact of these changes on the fabric of society from social, economic and political perspectives". In a 2013 study "The Future of Employment: How Susceptible are Jobs to Computerisation?" researchers Dr Carl Benedikt Frey and Dr Michael Osborne made an important observation: about 47% jobs in the US will be lost to automation. Dr Carl Frey is the co-director of programme on technology and employment at Oxford Martin School at Oxford University. His research focuses on "how advances in digital technology are reshaping the nature of work and jobs and what that might mean for the future". In 2016, he was named the 2nd most influential young opinion leader by the Swedish business magazine Veckans Affärer.