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AI & IP In Edge Computing For Faster 5G And The IoT

#artificialintelligence

Edge computing, which is the concept of processing and analyzing data in servers closer to the applications they serve, is growing in popularity and opening new markets for established telecom providers, semiconductor startups, and new software ecosystems. It's brilliant how technology has come together over the last several decades to enable this new space starting with Big Data and the idea that with lots of information, now stored in mega sized data centers, we can analyze the chaos in the world to provide new value to consumers. Combine this concept with IoT and connected everything, from coffee cups to pill dispensers, oil refineries to paper mills, smart goggles to watches, and the value to the consumer could be infinite. However, many argue the market didn't experience the hockey stick growth curves expected for the Internet of Things. The connectivity of the IoT simply didn't bring enough consumer value, except for specific niches. Over the past 5 years, however, technology advancements as artificial intelligence (AI) have begun to revolutionize industries and the concepts of the amount of value that connectivity can provide to consumers.


Development in the mobility technology ecosystem--how can 5G help?

#artificialintelligence

The current whirlwind of disruptions buffeting the automotive world have created a massive value-chain disconnect. When viewed through the lens of tomorrow's product requirements, one thing becomes clear: you can't easily get there from here. McKinsey has identified four major disruptions facing the industry today (Exhibit 1). Collectively known as "ACES"--for autonomous vehicles, connected cars, electrification, and shared mobility--these trends will ultimately drive a change in the way the automotive industry develops cars (see sidebar "ACES: The four trends shaping tomorrow's cars" for more detail). We believe tomorrow's cars will be autonomous, connected, electrified, and shared (ACES). They will be fully autonomous, with no driver.


Top 10 Predictions for Global Manufacturing in 2018: IDC

#artificialintelligence

IDC recently released a report, "IDC FutureScape: Worldwide Manufacturing Predictions 2018," surveying the global manufacturing landscape. When creating its predictions the firm examined ecosystems and experiences, greater intelligence in operational assets and processes, data capitalization, the convergence of information technology (IT) and operations. Most of the group's predictions refer to a continuum of change and digital transformation (DX) within the wider ecosystem of the manufacturing industry and global economy.


10 Emerging Cloud Computing Trends To Watch In 2020

#artificialintelligence

Developments in the cloud computing industry move at a pace that can be maddening to follow and impossible to predict. But some big-picture trends that will characterize the market for the next year are coming into focus, even if the technologies that ultimately enable them and vendors that drive them seem constantly in flux and vulnerable to disruption. Many of those emerging cloud computing trends stem from the industry entering a phase of standardization and increased compatibility--a sign of maturity in any tech sector. Cloud infrastructure--public, hosted private and on-premises--is increasingly less siloed, allowing workloads to be more portable and data streams more mobile. That standardization, largely thanks to the open-source movement, is allowing a shift in focus up the stack, with new channel roles emerging to support application-level processes, from enabling artificial intelligence and high-performance computing, to delivering novel SaaSOps and application development services.


10 Emerging Cloud Computing Trends To Watch In 2020

#artificialintelligence

Developments in the cloud computing industry move at a pace that can be maddening to follow and impossible to predict. But some big-picture trends that will characterize the market for the next year are coming into focus, even if the technologies that ultimately enable them and vendors that drive them seem constantly in flux and vulnerable to disruption. Many of those emerging cloud computing trends stem from the industry entering a phase of standardization and increased compatibility--a sign of maturity in any tech sector. Cloud infrastructure--public, hosted private and on-premises--is increasingly less siloed, allowing workloads to be more portable and data streams more mobile. That standardization, largely thanks to the open-source movement, is allowing a shift in focus up the stack, with new channel roles emerging to support application-level processes, from enabling artificial intelligence and high-performance computing, to delivering novel SaaSOps and application development services.