Goto

Collaborating Authors

Peering into the future of IT: Business adoption plans for IoT, AI, VR, and beyond ZDNet

#artificialintelligence

Among emerging technologies, IT professionals expect Internet of Things (IoT) devices and artificial intelligence (AI) technology to have the biggest impact in the workplace, according to a new report from online IT professionals community Spiceworks. The study, "Future of IT: Hype vs. Reality," examines organizations' adoption plans for technologies such as virtual reality (VR), 3D printing, IoT and AI. While survey respondents don't expect mass adoption to take off for VR and 3D printers, some industries have significantly higher adoption rates than the industry average, the report notes. Of the 566 IT professionals surveyed worldwide in October 2016, 80 percent said IoT devices will be useful to their business practices in three to five years, and nearly 60 percent said the same for AI. Over the next five years 60 percent of companies plan to adopt machine learning and 72 percent plan to deploy business analytics with AI.


Peering into the future of IT: Business adoption plans for IoT, AI, VR, and beyond ZDNet

#artificialintelligence

Among emerging technologies, IT professionals expect Internet of Things (IoT) devices and artificial intelligence (AI) technology to have the biggest impact in the workplace, according to a new report from online IT professionals community Spiceworks. The study, "Future of IT: Hype vs. Reality," examines organizations' adoption plans for technologies such as virtual reality (VR), 3D printing, IoT and AI. While survey respondents don't expect mass adoption to take off for VR and 3D printers, some industries have significantly higher adoption rates than the industry average, the report notes. Of the 566 IT professionals surveyed worldwide in October 2016, 80 percent said IoT devices will be useful to their business practices in three to five years, and nearly 60 percent said the same for AI. Over the next five years 60 percent of companies plan to adopt machine learning and 72 percent plan to deploy business analytics with AI.


La veille de la cybersécurité

#artificialintelligence

Only 20% of U.S. companies are fully deploying artificial intelligence (AI) for decision-making in their businesses based on survey responses from 1,000 senior business executives. According to the news site Axios, 61% of organizations are just starting to adopt AI for decision-making, while 19% are categorized as having barely begun. Surveyed business leaders are hesitant to adopt AI because many organizations--particularly non-tech companies--"don't completely trust it" and "can't tap the talent they need." However, businesses that decide not to adopt the technology risk falling behind. "The majority of executives get stuck in a vicious circle where when they first try AI, the first wave of results tend to be underwhelming," Ben Pring, managing director at Cognizant's Center for the Future of Work, a consulting firm that conducted the survey, told Axios.


Ethical Frameworks for AI Aren't Enough

#artificialintelligence

These are just a few of the ill-defined principles commonly listed in ethical frameworks for artificial intelligence (AI), hundreds of which have now been released by organizations ranging from Google to the government of Canada to BMW. As organizations embrace AI with increasing speed, adopting these principles is widely viewed as one of the best ways to ensure AI does not cause unintended harms. Many AI ethical frameworks cannot be clearly implemented in practice, as researchers have consistently demonstrated. Without a dramatic increase in the specificity of existing AI frameworks, there's simply not much technical personnel can do to clearly uphold such high-level guidance. And this, in turn, means that while AI ethics frameworks may make for good marketing campaigns, they all too frequently fail to stop AI from causing the very harms they are meant to prevent.


Coronavirus as an Opportunity to Evolve Security Architecture

#artificialintelligence

Self-quarantined employees are forcing organizations to allow access to critical data remotely. Coronavirus is presenting organizations with a unique opportunity to adopt modern security protocols and enable an efficient remote workforce. Fear of Coronavirus infections has resulted in organizations ruling out large meetings. Healthy individuals are in home-quarantine for weeks at a time, even though they are not necessarily thought to carry the virus. This large number of individuals complying with house arrest is putting a strain on many organizations that have not shifted their working styles to accommodate large-scale remote workers.